Traducción: de espanol

abhors

  • 1 aborrecer

    v.
    1 to abhor, to loathe.
    2 to hate, to declare hateful, to despise, to can not abide.
    3 to dislike very much to, to dislike intensely to, to hate to, to loathe to.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ AGRADECER], like link=agradecer agradecer
    1 to abhor, hate, detest
    2 (aves) to abandon
    * * *
    verb
    to loathe, hate
    * * *
    VT
    1) (=odiar) to loathe, detest; (=aburrirse con) to become bored by
    2) [+ crías] to desert, abandon
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1) <persona/actividad> to detest, loathe
    2) < crías> to reject
    * * *
    = abhor, loathe, detest.
    Ex. Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum', and he seeks constantly to impose a pattern on what he sees.
    Ex. He sometimes loathed the books he recommended as much as the children they were inflicted upon loathed them.
    Ex. This resulted in Africans loving and aspiring to everything European and detesting and deeming inferior anything that is African.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1) <persona/actividad> to detest, loathe
    2) < crías> to reject
    * * *
    = abhor, loathe, detest.

    Ex: Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum', and he seeks constantly to impose a pattern on what he sees.

    Ex: He sometimes loathed the books he recommended as much as the children they were inflicted upon loathed them.
    Ex: This resulted in Africans loving and aspiring to everything European and detesting and deeming inferior anything that is African.

    * * *
    aborrecer [E3 ]
    vt
    A ‹persona/actividad› to detest, loathe
    B ‹crías› to reject
    * * *

    aborrecer ( conjugate aborrecer) verbo transitivo
    a)persona/actividad to detest, loathe

    b) crías to reject

    aborrecer verbo transitivo to detest, loathe
    ' aborrecer' also found in these entries:
    English:
    abhor
    * * *
    1. [odiar] to abhor, to loathe;
    me hizo aborrecer la comida picante it really put me off spicy food;
    aborrece la soledad she loathes being on her own
    2. [crías] to reject
    * * *
    v/t loathe, detest
    * * *
    aborrecer {53} vt
    abominar, odiar: to abhor, to detest, to hate
    * * *
    aborrecer vb to detest / to hate

    Spanish-English dictionary > aborrecer

  • 2 caos

    m. s.&pl.
    chaos.
    ser un caos to be in chaos
    * * *
    1 chaos
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    SM INV chaos

    su mesa de trabajo era un caos total — his desk was complete chaos, his desk was a complete mess

    * * *
    masculino chaos
    * * *
    = mass confusion, chaos, mayhem, shambles, lawlessness.
    Ex. Finally, add the mass confusion wrought by the sudden appearance of a new technology in the library, with its practitioners chanting acronymic prayers, seemingly derived from a mushroom ritual.
    Ex. Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum'.
    Ex. It is the individual citer who causes most mayhem by attaching citations to his writings which are inconsistent and idiosyncratic.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'From shambles to showplace'.
    Ex. So the Marxists will have to pull up their socks if they are to prevent the state from sliding back to the lawlessness one had seen prior to 1977.
    ----
    * imponer orden en donde hay caos = bring + order out of chaos.
    * poner orden en el caos = create + order out of chaos.
    * producir caos = cause + chaos.
    * producirse caos = chaos + result, chaos + arise.
    * ser un caos = be a shambles, be (in) a mess.
    * * *
    masculino chaos
    * * *
    = mass confusion, chaos, mayhem, shambles, lawlessness.

    Ex: Finally, add the mass confusion wrought by the sudden appearance of a new technology in the library, with its practitioners chanting acronymic prayers, seemingly derived from a mushroom ritual.

    Ex: Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum'.
    Ex: It is the individual citer who causes most mayhem by attaching citations to his writings which are inconsistent and idiosyncratic.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'From shambles to showplace'.
    Ex: So the Marxists will have to pull up their socks if they are to prevent the state from sliding back to the lawlessness one had seen prior to 1977.
    * imponer orden en donde hay caos = bring + order out of chaos.
    * poner orden en el caos = create + order out of chaos.
    * producir caos = cause + chaos.
    * producirse caos = chaos + result, chaos + arise.
    * ser un caos = be a shambles, be (in) a mess.

    * * *
    chaos
    esta habitación es un verdadero caos this room is in complete chaos o ( colloq) is a complete shambles o is in a real mess
    traté de ordenar el caos de mis ideas I tried to introduce some order into the chaos of my ideas
    * * *

     

    caos sustantivo masculino
    chaos;

    caos sustantivo masculino chaos

    ' caos' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    follón
    - mico
    - abatir
    - borde
    - despelote
    English:
    chaos
    - havoc
    - lawlessness
    - shambles
    - wreak
    - mayhem
    * * *
    caos nm inv
    chaos;
    ser un caos to be in chaos;
    el caos en el transporte público the chaotic state of public transport
    * * *
    m chaos;
    caos circulatorio traffic chaos
    * * *
    caos nm
    : chaos
    * * *
    caos n chaos

    Spanish-English dictionary > caos

  • 3 conservador

    adj.
    1 conservative, discreet, moderate, restrained.
    2 conservative, orthodox, rightist, right-wing.
    3 Conservative.
    m.
    1 conservative, praetorian, rightist, right-winger.
    2 preservative, preserver.
    3 Conservative.
    4 curator.
    * * *
    1 PLÍTICA conservative
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 PLÍTICA conservative
    2 (de museos) curator
    * * *
    1. (f. - conservadora)
    noun
    2. (f. - conservadora)
    adj.
    * * *
    conservador, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (Pol) conservative, Tory
    2) (Culin) preservative
    2. SM / F
    1) (Pol) conservative, Tory
    2) [de museo] curator, keeper
    * * *
    I
    - dora adjetivo conservative
    II
    - dora masculino, femenino
    a) (Pol) conservative
    b) ( de museo) curator
    * * *
    = conservative, conservator, curator, custodian, standpatter, preserver, ingrown, old-fashioned, backward-looking, keeper, custodial, Luddite, laggard, conservationist, conservative, illiberal, risk-averse, tweedy [tweedier -comp., tweediest -sup.], safekeeper [sake-keeper], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], straitlaced [strait-laced].
    Ex. There is a tendency to advance propositions premised upon the assumption that SLIS are staffed by inherently conservative, where they are not simply obtuse, individuals.
    Ex. The benefits of an on-site conservation laboratory and conservator are underlined.
    Ex. In her previous vocation she served as curator of History at the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences and later as Assistant to the Director of Johns Hopkins University, Institute of History and Medicine.
    Ex. This article maintains that archivists as custodians of the records have an ethical obligation to support the freest possible access to public records.
    Ex. The 'standpatters' have seen power shift away from themselves to the newcomers and other lifelong 'progressive' Junctionvillers, who were muted under previous administrations.
    Ex. He also lumps himself and librarians together as 'devoted and in some instances veteran pursuers, preservers, and disseminators of truth'.
    Ex. Book clubs need not be enclosed, much less ingrown = Los clubs de lectores no deben ser cerrados y mucho menos conservadores.
    Ex. One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex. The book is essentially backward-looking rather than forward-looking in content.
    Ex. Vervliet's involvement with books began with his appointment in 1949 as keeper at the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp, where he acquired a wide knowledge of the history of printing in the Low Countries.
    Ex. Broadly, one can distinguish, then, between what one might call the ' custodial' or 'warehouse' aspects of the librarian's task, and the 'communications' aspect.
    Ex. Librarians who have reservations about the spread of electronically based services are not Luddites.
    Ex. Individuals are distributed along a normal bell-shaped curve, with the majority in the large center and innovators and laggards a the the two extremes.
    Ex. The present conservationist approach to librarianship reflects Victorian priorities.
    Ex. He ends his book with a discussion of the politicizing effects of the actions of conservatives and loyalists at the end of the century.
    Ex. It is argued that Israel, in spite of its free elections, is an illiberal democracy.
    Ex. This is typical of the old corporate forms of hierarchy-based processes and of the ' risk-averse systems that crush new ideas'.
    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex. Libraries find themselves frustrated in their role as safekeepers of science: how can they ensure optimal access and availability if they do not control the access systems?.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. Three years later, when he was fifteen, he slipped into Rachel's bedroom and her straitlaced mother caught them petting and giggling on the side of the bed.
    ----
    * conservador de documentos = records custodian.
    * conservador del archivo = archives custodian.
    * de un modo conservador = conservatively.
    * neoconservador = neoconservative [neo-conservative], neoconservative [neo-conservative].
    * partido conservador = conservative party.
    * * *
    I
    - dora adjetivo conservative
    II
    - dora masculino, femenino
    a) (Pol) conservative
    b) ( de museo) curator
    * * *
    = conservative, conservator, curator, custodian, standpatter, preserver, ingrown, old-fashioned, backward-looking, keeper, custodial, Luddite, laggard, conservationist, conservative, illiberal, risk-averse, tweedy [tweedier -comp., tweediest -sup.], safekeeper [sake-keeper], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], straitlaced [strait-laced].

    Ex: There is a tendency to advance propositions premised upon the assumption that SLIS are staffed by inherently conservative, where they are not simply obtuse, individuals.

    Ex: The benefits of an on-site conservation laboratory and conservator are underlined.
    Ex: In her previous vocation she served as curator of History at the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences and later as Assistant to the Director of Johns Hopkins University, Institute of History and Medicine.
    Ex: This article maintains that archivists as custodians of the records have an ethical obligation to support the freest possible access to public records.
    Ex: The 'standpatters' have seen power shift away from themselves to the newcomers and other lifelong 'progressive' Junctionvillers, who were muted under previous administrations.
    Ex: He also lumps himself and librarians together as 'devoted and in some instances veteran pursuers, preservers, and disseminators of truth'.
    Ex: Book clubs need not be enclosed, much less ingrown = Los clubs de lectores no deben ser cerrados y mucho menos conservadores.
    Ex: One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex: The book is essentially backward-looking rather than forward-looking in content.
    Ex: Vervliet's involvement with books began with his appointment in 1949 as keeper at the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp, where he acquired a wide knowledge of the history of printing in the Low Countries.
    Ex: Broadly, one can distinguish, then, between what one might call the ' custodial' or 'warehouse' aspects of the librarian's task, and the 'communications' aspect.
    Ex: Librarians who have reservations about the spread of electronically based services are not Luddites.
    Ex: Individuals are distributed along a normal bell-shaped curve, with the majority in the large center and innovators and laggards a the the two extremes.
    Ex: The present conservationist approach to librarianship reflects Victorian priorities.
    Ex: He ends his book with a discussion of the politicizing effects of the actions of conservatives and loyalists at the end of the century.
    Ex: It is argued that Israel, in spite of its free elections, is an illiberal democracy.
    Ex: This is typical of the old corporate forms of hierarchy-based processes and of the ' risk-averse systems that crush new ideas'.
    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex: Libraries find themselves frustrated in their role as safekeepers of science: how can they ensure optimal access and availability if they do not control the access systems?.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: Three years later, when he was fifteen, he slipped into Rachel's bedroom and her straitlaced mother caught them petting and giggling on the side of the bed.
    * conservador de documentos = records custodian.
    * conservador del archivo = archives custodian.
    * de un modo conservador = conservatively.
    * neoconservador = neoconservative [neo-conservative], neoconservative [neo-conservative].
    * partido conservador = conservative party.

    * * *
    1 ( Pol) ‹partido/gobierno› conservative
    2 (tradicional) ‹persona/ideas› conservative
    es muy conservador en sus gustos he's very conservative in his tastes
    masculine, feminine
    1 ( Pol) conservative
    2 (de un museo) curator
    3
    conservador masculine ( Coc) preservative
    * * *

    conservador
    ◊ - dora adjetivo

    conservative
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    a) (Pol) conservative


    conservador,-ora
    I adjetivo & sustantivo masculino y femenino conservative
    Pol Conservative
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino
    1 Pol Conservative
    2 (de un museo, una biblioteca) curator
    ' conservador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    barrer
    - bloque
    - conservadora
    - europeísta
    English:
    conservative
    - keeper
    - seat
    - Tory
    - wet
    - Conservative
    - curator
    - custodian
    - round
    * * *
    conservador, -ora
    adj
    1. [tradicionalista] conservative;
    es un entrenador muy conservador he's a very conservative manager
    2. [del partido conservador] Conservative
    nm,f
    1. [tradicionalista] conservative
    2. [miembro del partido conservador] Conservative
    3. [de museo] curator;
    [de biblioteca] librarian; [de parque natural] keeper
    * * *
    I adj conservative
    II m, conservadora f
    1 de museo curator
    2 POL conservative
    * * *
    conservador, - dora adj & n
    : conservative
    : preservative
    * * *
    conservador adj n conservative

    Spanish-English dictionary > conservador

  • 4 decrépito

    adj.
    decrepit, crippled, wasted-away.
    * * *
    1 decrepit
    * * *
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo decrepit
    * * *
    = decrepit, creaky [creakier -comp., creakiest -sup.].
    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex. With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.
    * * *
    - ta adjetivo decrepit
    * * *
    = decrepit, creaky [creakier -comp., creakiest -sup.].

    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.

    Ex: With every air-conditioner running at full blast, the city's creaky infrastructure is often stretched beyond the breaking point.

    * * *
    ‹viejo› decrepit ‹autobús/coche› ( hum) decrepit, dilapidated, beat-up ( AmE colloq), clapped-out ( BrE colloq)
    * * *

    decrépito
    ◊ -ta adjetivo

    decrepit
    decrépito,-a adjetivo decrepit

    ' decrépito' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    caduca
    - caduco
    - decrépita
    English:
    decrepit
    * * *
    decrépito, -a adj
    Pey
    1. [anciano] decrepit
    2. [civilización, industria] decadent, declining
    3. [automóvil, tren, edificio] dilapidated;
    [coche] Br clapped-out, US beat-up
    * * *
    adj decrepit
    * * *
    decrépito, -ta adj
    : decrepit

    Spanish-English dictionary > decrépito

  • 5 desorden

    m.
    1 disorder, chaos.
    tu dormitorio está en desorden your bedroom is in a mess
    3 disorder.
    sufre desórdenes nerviosos/estomacales he has a nervous/stomach complaint
    * * *
    1 disorder, disarray, mess, untidiness
    ¡vaya desorden! what a mess!
    2 (irregularidad) irregularity
    1 (disturbios) riots, disturbances, disorder sing
    2 (excesos) excesses
    3 (malestar) disorders
    * * *
    noun m.
    1) disorder, mess
    * * *
    SM
    1) (=falta de orden) [de objetos, ideas] chaos; [de casa, habitación] mess, untidiness

    en desorden[gente] in confusion; [objetos] in a mess, in disorder más frm

    2) (=confusión) confusion
    3) pl desórdenes (=alborotos) disturbances; (=excesos) excesses; (Med) disorders
    * * *
    1)
    a) (de persona, cuarto, cajón) untidiness

    en desorden<salir/entrar> in a disorderly fashion

    b) ( confusión) disorder
    2) desórdenes masculino plural
    a) ( disturbios) disturbances (pl), disorder
    b) (Med) disorders (pl)
    * * *
    = disorder, chaos, muddle, turbulence, mess, messiness, turbulent waters, anomie, clutter, brouhaha, lawlessness, riot.
    Ex. Consider this title 'A handbook of heart disease, blood pressure and strokes: the cause, treatment and prevention of these disorders'.
    Ex. Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum'.
    Ex. The author attempts to sort out the muddle in which librarians have found themselves = El autor intenta aclarar la confusión en la que se encuentran los bibliotecarios.
    Ex. The title of the article is 'Survival skills for information professionals in the decade of turbulence'.
    Ex. 'Look, Mel,' said James after the hiatus, 'I'm irritated at the convoluted mess this simple case of filling a vacancy has become'.
    Ex. Management theorists seem unable to cope with the unpredictability, the multivariate nature and the ' messiness' of human organizations in cultural contexts.
    Ex. His experience and expertise has guided IFLA members smoothly across what could easily have been turbulent waters = Sus conocimientos y experiencia en la formulación de los Estatutos ha guiado a los miembros de la IFLA sin problemas a través de lo que podrían haber sido fácilmente aguas turbulentas.
    Ex. The implication was that as modern society continued to develop, anomie would increase.
    Ex. We can learn from good shopwindow displays and from the best museums about such matters as grouping of books shown and the number included ( clutter is ugly and overcrowding confuses the eye).
    Ex. He believes that most political brouhahas are cooked up to divert the public's attention from the real terrorism.
    Ex. So the Marxists will have to pull up their socks if they are to prevent the state from sliding back to the lawlessness one had seen prior to 1977.
    Ex. The subjects referred to recur frequently in the writings of the 'socially committed' -- drugs, sex, racism, student unrest, riots, scandals in government, conservation, the role of women in society are among them.
    ----
    * causar desórdenes = riot.
    * desorden alimenticio = eating disorder.
    * desorden público = public disorder.
    * desorden social = social disorder.
    * * *
    1)
    a) (de persona, cuarto, cajón) untidiness

    en desorden<salir/entrar> in a disorderly fashion

    b) ( confusión) disorder
    2) desórdenes masculino plural
    a) ( disturbios) disturbances (pl), disorder
    b) (Med) disorders (pl)
    * * *
    = disorder, chaos, muddle, turbulence, mess, messiness, turbulent waters, anomie, clutter, brouhaha, lawlessness, riot.

    Ex: Consider this title 'A handbook of heart disease, blood pressure and strokes: the cause, treatment and prevention of these disorders'.

    Ex: Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum'.
    Ex: The author attempts to sort out the muddle in which librarians have found themselves = El autor intenta aclarar la confusión en la que se encuentran los bibliotecarios.
    Ex: The title of the article is 'Survival skills for information professionals in the decade of turbulence'.
    Ex: 'Look, Mel,' said James after the hiatus, 'I'm irritated at the convoluted mess this simple case of filling a vacancy has become'.
    Ex: Management theorists seem unable to cope with the unpredictability, the multivariate nature and the ' messiness' of human organizations in cultural contexts.
    Ex: His experience and expertise has guided IFLA members smoothly across what could easily have been turbulent waters = Sus conocimientos y experiencia en la formulación de los Estatutos ha guiado a los miembros de la IFLA sin problemas a través de lo que podrían haber sido fácilmente aguas turbulentas.
    Ex: The implication was that as modern society continued to develop, anomie would increase.
    Ex: We can learn from good shopwindow displays and from the best museums about such matters as grouping of books shown and the number included ( clutter is ugly and overcrowding confuses the eye).
    Ex: He believes that most political brouhahas are cooked up to divert the public's attention from the real terrorism.
    Ex: So the Marxists will have to pull up their socks if they are to prevent the state from sliding back to the lawlessness one had seen prior to 1977.
    Ex: The subjects referred to recur frequently in the writings of the 'socially committed' -- drugs, sex, racism, student unrest, riots, scandals in government, conservation, the role of women in society are among them.
    * causar desórdenes = riot.
    * desorden alimenticio = eating disorder.
    * desorden público = public disorder.
    * desorden social = social disorder.

    * * *
    A (falta de orden) disorder
    el desorden más absoluto reinaba en la habitación the room was in complete disorder o an incredible mess
    todo estaba en desorden everything was in disorder o in a mess
    perdona el desorden sorry about the mess
    dejó las fichas en desorden she left the cards out of order
    se retiraron en desorden they withdrew in disorder o disarray o confusion
    1 (disturbios) disturbances (pl), disorder
    2 (excesos) excesses (pl)
    3 ( Med) disorders (pl)
    * * *

    desorden sustantivo masculino
    1
    a) (de persona, cuarto, cajón) untidiness, mess (colloq);


    en desorden ‹salir/entrar in a disorderly fashion;
    todo estaba en desorden everything was in disorder o in a mess

    2
    desórdenes sustantivo masculino plural ( disturbios) disturbances (pl), disorder

    desorden sustantivo masculino
    1 disorder
    (de una habitación) untidiness, mess: ¡cuánto desorden!, what a mess! 2 desórdenes, (alteración del orden público) disturbances
    (excesos) excesses
    ' desorden' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cachondeo
    - confusión
    - enfermar
    - lío
    - torre
    - barullo
    - follón
    - jaleo
    - revoltijo
    - tirado
    English:
    anyhow
    - clutter
    - disarray
    - disorder
    - foul up
    - lawlessness
    - mess
    - muddle
    - ruffled
    - straggle
    - tumble out
    - untidiness
    - confusion
    * * *
    1. [confusión] disorder, chaos;
    [falta de orden] mess;
    esto es un completo desorden this is absolute chaos, this is a complete mess;
    no sé cómo puedes encontrar nada en medio de este desorden I don't know how you can find anything in this mess;
    disculpa todo este desorden please excuse all this mess;
    tu dormitorio está en desorden your bedroom is in a mess;
    en esa casa reina el desorden it's chaos in this house
    2. [vida desenfrenada] excess
    3.
    desórdenes [disturbios] disturbance;
    se han producido desórdenes por toda la ciudad there have been disturbances throughout the city;
    desórdenes callejeros street disturbances
    4. [alteración física] disorder;
    sufre desórdenes nerviosos/estomacales he has a nervous/stomach complaint
    * * *
    m
    1 disorder; de habitación untidiness
    2
    :
    desórdenes pl disturbances
    * * *
    1) desbarajuste: disorder, mess
    2) : disorder, disturbance, upset
    * * *
    desorden n mess
    ¡vaya desorden! what a mess!

    Spanish-English dictionary > desorden

  • 6 destartalado

    adj.
    broken-down, broken, ruined, in shambles.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: destartalar.
    * * *
    1 (casa etc) tumbledown, ramshackle; (coche etc) clapped-out, rickety; (mueble) dilapidated, shabby
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [casa] (=grande, mal dispuesta) large and rambling; (=ruinoso) tumbledown
    2) [coche] rickety
    * * *
    - da adjetivo (fam) < coche> beat-up (AmE colloq), clapped-out (BrE colloq); < mueble> shabby; < casa> ramshackle, rundown
    * * *
    = decrepit, rickety, dilapidated, ramshackle.
    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex. Only the nomads travel by camel, other desert travellers have to depend on aged and rickety vehicles.
    Ex. China's transport authorities plan to scrap dilapidated ships to enhance safety and improve the competitiveness of the industry.
    Ex. The ramshackle village clings like a limpet to the cliffs.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo (fam) < coche> beat-up (AmE colloq), clapped-out (BrE colloq); < mueble> shabby; < casa> ramshackle, rundown
    * * *
    = decrepit, rickety, dilapidated, ramshackle.

    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.

    Ex: Only the nomads travel by camel, other desert travellers have to depend on aged and rickety vehicles.
    Ex: China's transport authorities plan to scrap dilapidated ships to enhance safety and improve the competitiveness of the industry.
    Ex: The ramshackle village clings like a limpet to the cliffs.

    * * *
    1 ( fam); ‹coche› dilapidated, beat-up ( AmE colloq), clapped-out ( BrE colloq); ‹mueble› dilapidated, shabby; ‹casa› ramshackle, rundown, dilapidated
    2 ( fam) (desordenado) untidy
    la casa está toda destartalada the house is very untidy o in a terrible mess
    * * *

    Del verbo destartalar: ( conjugate destartalar)

    destartalado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    destartalado    
    destartalar
    destartalado
    ◊ -da adjetivo (fam) ‹ coche beat-up (AmE colloq), clapped-out (BrE colloq);


    mueble shabby;
    casa ramshackle, rundown
    destartalado,-a adjetivo ramshackle
    destartalar vtr LAm (dejar una casa o sitio sin los objetos de uso habitual) to clean out
    ' destartalado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    destartalada
    English:
    dilapidated
    - ramshackle
    - run-down
    - broken-down
    - decrepit
    - scruffy
    * * *
    destartalado, -a adj
    1. [viejo, deteriorado] dilapidated
    2. [desordenado] untidy
    * * *
    adj vehículo, casa dilapidated
    * * *
    destartalado, -da adj
    : dilapidated, tumbledown

    Spanish-English dictionary > destartalado

  • 7 desvencijado

    adj.
    broken-down, shabby, rickety, ruinous.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: desvencijar.
    * * *
    1→ link=desvencijar desvencijar
    1 rickety, broken-down, dilapidated
    * * *
    ADJ [silla, mueble] rickety; [máquina] broken-down
    * * *
    - da adjetivo <silla/cama> rickety; < coche> dilapidated, beat-up (AmE colloq), clapped-out (BrE colloq)
    * * *
    = rickety, decrepit, dilapidated, ramshackle.
    Ex. Only the nomads travel by camel, other desert travellers have to depend on aged and rickety vehicles.
    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex. China's transport authorities plan to scrap dilapidated ships to enhance safety and improve the competitiveness of the industry.
    Ex. The ramshackle village clings like a limpet to the cliffs.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo <silla/cama> rickety; < coche> dilapidated, beat-up (AmE colloq), clapped-out (BrE colloq)
    * * *
    = rickety, decrepit, dilapidated, ramshackle.

    Ex: Only the nomads travel by camel, other desert travellers have to depend on aged and rickety vehicles.

    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex: China's transport authorities plan to scrap dilapidated ships to enhance safety and improve the competitiveness of the industry.
    Ex: The ramshackle village clings like a limpet to the cliffs.

    * * *
    ‹silla/cama› rickety, dilapidated; ‹coche› dilapidated, beat-up ( AmE colloq), clapped-out ( BrE colloq)
    la ventana quedó desvencijada the window was almost off its hinges
    ha sido un día agotador, estoy desvencijado ( fam); it's been an exhausting day, I'm whacked o dead beat o bushed ( colloq)
    * * *

    Del verbo desvencijar: ( conjugate desvencijar)

    desvencijado es:

    el participio

    desvencijado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹silla/cama rickety;


    coche dilapidated, beat-up (AmE colloq), clapped-out (BrE colloq)
    desvencijado,-a adjetivo ramshackle, rickety
    ' desvencijado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    desvencijada
    English:
    rickety
    * * *
    desvencijado, -a adj
    [mesa, armario] rickety; [puerta, vehículo] battered; [estructura] ramshackle, tumbledown
    * * *
    adj rickety
    * * *
    desvencijado, -da adj
    : dilapidated, rickety

    Spanish-English dictionary > desvencijado

  • 8 deteriorado

    adj.
    1 spoiled, damaged; worn; shopsoiled (géneros).
    2 impaired, damaged, deteriorated, shop-worn.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: deteriorar.
    * * *
    1→ link=deteriorar deteriorar
    1 damaged, worn
    * * *
    (f. - deteriorada)
    adj.
    2) worn
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) [edificio, mueble] dilapidated
    2) [ropa, alfombra] worn
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < mercancías> damaged; < edificio> dilapidated, run down
    * * *
    = impaired, decayed, decrepit, decaying, dilapidated, crumbling, disintegrating.
    Ex. In contrast to higher specificity, higher exhaustivity increases precision at the cost of impaired recall.
    Ex. The city was considered to be seedy ( decayed, littered, grimy, and dreary), crowded, busy, and strongly idiosyncratic (quaint, historic, colorful, and full of 'atmosphere').
    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex. Following World War II, 'urban renewal' referred primarily to public efforts to revitalize aging and decaying inner cities.
    Ex. China's transport authorities plan to scrap dilapidated ships to enhance safety and improve the competitiveness of the industry.
    Ex. We must now look beyond crumbling books to determine the deeper significance of our stewardship obligations for the future = Debemos mirar más allá de los libros en deterioro para determinar cuál es el verdadero significado de nuestras obligaciones para el futuro.
    Ex. For all Havana's crumbling structures, its disintegrating roads and toxin-belching jalopies, it attracts over a million tourists each year.
    ----
    * deteriorado por el humo = smoke-damaged.
    * deteriorado por el paso del tiempo = timeworn.
    * no estar deteriorado = unimpaired.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < mercancías> damaged; < edificio> dilapidated, run down
    * * *
    = impaired, decayed, decrepit, decaying, dilapidated, crumbling, disintegrating.

    Ex: In contrast to higher specificity, higher exhaustivity increases precision at the cost of impaired recall.

    Ex: The city was considered to be seedy ( decayed, littered, grimy, and dreary), crowded, busy, and strongly idiosyncratic (quaint, historic, colorful, and full of 'atmosphere').
    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex: Following World War II, 'urban renewal' referred primarily to public efforts to revitalize aging and decaying inner cities.
    Ex: China's transport authorities plan to scrap dilapidated ships to enhance safety and improve the competitiveness of the industry.
    Ex: We must now look beyond crumbling books to determine the deeper significance of our stewardship obligations for the future = Debemos mirar más allá de los libros en deterioro para determinar cuál es el verdadero significado de nuestras obligaciones para el futuro.
    Ex: For all Havana's crumbling structures, its disintegrating roads and toxin-belching jalopies, it attracts over a million tourists each year.
    * deteriorado por el humo = smoke-damaged.
    * deteriorado por el paso del tiempo = timeworn.
    * no estar deteriorado = unimpaired.

    * * *
    ‹mercancías› damaged; ‹edificio› dilapidated, run down
    es una mesa bonita pero está muy deteriorada it's a nice table but it's in very bad condition
    * * *

    Del verbo deteriorar: ( conjugate deteriorar)

    deteriorado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    deteriorado    
    deteriorar
    deteriorado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹ mercancías damaged;


    edificio dilapidated, run down;
    mueble/cuadro in bad condition
    deteriorar ( conjugate deteriorar) verbo transitivorelaciones/salud/situaciónto cause … to deteriorate
    deteriorarse verbo pronominal [relaciones/salud/situación] to deteriorate, worsen;
    [ mercancías] to get damaged
    deteriorar verbo transitivo to spoil, damage
    ' deteriorado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    gastada
    - gastado
    English:
    shop-soiled
    - decrepit
    - fail
    - shop
    * * *
    deteriorado, -a adj
    [estropeado] damaged, spoilt; [por los elementos naturales] damaged; [edificio] dilapidated;
    el género llegó muy deteriorado the goods arrived in poor condition;
    el famoso cuadro se halla muy deteriorado the famous painting is in very poor condition;
    las relaciones entre ambos países están muy deterioradas relations between the two countries have greatly deteriorated
    * * *
    adj damaged
    * * *
    deteriorado, -da adj
    : damaged, worn

    Spanish-English dictionary > deteriorado

  • 9 detestar

    v.
    1 to detest.
    María odia los discursos Mary hates speeches.
    2 to hate to.
    * * *
    1 to detest, hate, abhor
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    VT to detest, loathe
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to hate, detest
    * * *
    = abhor, hate, loathe, put off, detest.
    Ex. Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum', and he seeks constantly to impose a pattern on what he sees.
    Ex. I would hate to see us add more responsibility at this time, when librarians are already reeling.
    Ex. He sometimes loathed the books he recommended as much as the children they were inflicted upon loathed them.
    Ex. Whatever the situation, prepared for or unexpected, it is always too easy to overplay one's hand, praising a book so extravagantly, so effusively, that many children are put off.
    Ex. This resulted in Africans loving and aspiring to everything European and detesting and deeming inferior anything that is African.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo to hate, detest
    * * *
    = abhor, hate, loathe, put off, detest.

    Ex: Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum', and he seeks constantly to impose a pattern on what he sees.

    Ex: I would hate to see us add more responsibility at this time, when librarians are already reeling.
    Ex: He sometimes loathed the books he recommended as much as the children they were inflicted upon loathed them.
    Ex: Whatever the situation, prepared for or unexpected, it is always too easy to overplay one's hand, praising a book so extravagantly, so effusively, that many children are put off.
    Ex: This resulted in Africans loving and aspiring to everything European and detesting and deeming inferior anything that is African.

    * * *
    detestar [A1 ]
    vt
    to hate, detest
    detesto esta ciudad/este clima I hate o detest o loathe this city/this climate, I can't stand this city/this climate
    * * *

    detestar ( conjugate detestar) verbo transitivo
    to hate, detest
    detestar verbo transitivo to detest, hate ➣ Ver notas en detest y hate
    ' detestar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    detest
    - loathe
    - abhor
    - hate
    * * *
    to detest;
    detesto trabajar los sábados I hate working on Saturdays;
    te detesto I despise o hate you
    * * *
    v/t detest
    * * *
    : to detest
    detestable adj
    * * *
    detestar vb to detest / to hate

    Spanish-English dictionary > detestar

  • 10 naturaleza,1 la

    1 = nature.
    Ex. Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum', and he seeks constantly to impose a pattern on what he sees.
    ----
    * amante de la naturaleza = nature lover.
    * en la naturaleza = in the wild.
    * error de la naturaleza = freak of nature.
    * fuerza de la naturaleza = force of nature.
    * leyes de la naturaleza = nature's laws, laws of nature.
    * madre naturaleza, la = Mother Nature.
    * maravilla de la naturaleza = natural wonder.
    * milagro de la naturaleza = miracle of nature.
    * naturaleza muerta = still life.
    * que se encuentra en la naturaleza = naturally-occurring.

    Spanish-English dictionary > naturaleza,1 la

  • 11 tradicional1

    1 = time-honoured, traditional, established, old-fashioned, tradition-bound, ancestral, standard, conventional, folkloristic, folkloric, tweedy [tweedier -comp., tweediest -sup.], brick(s) and mortar, timeworn.
    Ex. The time-honoured training institution 'sitting with Nellie' is not much good if Nellie's competence is not up to scratch.
    Ex. It may well be that the computer-based environment of such systems may overcome many of the limitations of enumerative classification schemes in their traditional applications.
    Ex. These are trends designed to to break down boundaries of exclusivity erected by established professions to exploit their monopolistic advantages.
    Ex. One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex. Tradition-bound acquisitions librarians may soon find themselves expendable -- acceptance of new technologies is essential for the survival of the acquisitions librarian.
    Ex. All the libraries reflect colonial influence but there is a strong movement towards the study of their ancestral heritage.
    Ex. Photographs are normally kept in drawers of standard filing cabinets, with folders or pockets, or both.
    Ex. The foregoing discussion concerning analytical entries assumes implicitly a conventional catalogue format, that is, card, microform or other printed catalogue.
    Ex. The cult of information forms the catalyst for a discussion of the ways in which information has acquired folkloristic status as the major way in which people look at the world.
    Ex. Such recordings often originate in field work and are ethnomusicological, ethnolinguistic or folkloric in content.
    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex. Advocates of the virtual university assume that the Internet can be used to replace the bricks and mortar campus.
    Ex. But beyond the honeymoon hotels and resorts, Polynesian life goes on and timeworn traditions are preserved.
    ----
    * arte tradicional = folk art.
    * biblioteca tradicional = brick and mortar library.
    * biblioteca traditional = physical library.
    * costumbre tradicional = traditional custom.
    * cultura tradicional = traditional culture.
    * estilo tradicional = traditional style.
    * literatura tradicional = folk literature.
    * mercado tradicional = traditional market.
    * modo de vida tradicional = folklife.
    * museo tradicional = folk museum, folklore museum.
    * no tradicional = non-traditional [nontraditional].
    * ya tradicional = long-established.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tradicional1

  • 12 vestuto

    Ex. No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    * * *

    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.

    Spanish-English dictionary > vestuto

  • 13 tradicional

    adj.
    traditional.
    * * *
    1 traditional
    \
    es lo tradicional it's the traditional thing to do
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    * * *
    adjetivo traditional

    mañana, como es ya tradicional,... — tomorrow, as is customary...

    * * *
    adjetivo traditional

    mañana, como es ya tradicional,... — tomorrow, as is customary...

    * * *
    tradicional1
    1 = time-honoured, traditional, established, old-fashioned, tradition-bound, ancestral, standard, conventional, folkloristic, folkloric, tweedy [tweedier -comp., tweediest -sup.], brick(s) and mortar, timeworn.

    Ex: The time-honoured training institution 'sitting with Nellie' is not much good if Nellie's competence is not up to scratch.

    Ex: It may well be that the computer-based environment of such systems may overcome many of the limitations of enumerative classification schemes in their traditional applications.
    Ex: These are trends designed to to break down boundaries of exclusivity erected by established professions to exploit their monopolistic advantages.
    Ex: One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex: Tradition-bound acquisitions librarians may soon find themselves expendable -- acceptance of new technologies is essential for the survival of the acquisitions librarian.
    Ex: All the libraries reflect colonial influence but there is a strong movement towards the study of their ancestral heritage.
    Ex: Photographs are normally kept in drawers of standard filing cabinets, with folders or pockets, or both.
    Ex: The foregoing discussion concerning analytical entries assumes implicitly a conventional catalogue format, that is, card, microform or other printed catalogue.
    Ex: The cult of information forms the catalyst for a discussion of the ways in which information has acquired folkloristic status as the major way in which people look at the world.
    Ex: Such recordings often originate in field work and are ethnomusicological, ethnolinguistic or folkloric in content.
    Ex: No bright new digital firm can do without at least some of the supposedly decrepit bureaucracy it so abhors in the old tweedy institutions it wants to replace.
    Ex: Advocates of the virtual university assume that the Internet can be used to replace the bricks and mortar campus.
    Ex: But beyond the honeymoon hotels and resorts, Polynesian life goes on and timeworn traditions are preserved.
    * arte tradicional = folk art.
    * biblioteca tradicional = brick and mortar library.
    * biblioteca traditional = physical library.
    * costumbre tradicional = traditional custom.
    * cultura tradicional = traditional culture.
    * estilo tradicional = traditional style.
    * literatura tradicional = folk literature.
    * mercado tradicional = traditional market.
    * modo de vida tradicional = folklife.
    * museo tradicional = folk museum, folklore museum.
    * no tradicional = non-traditional [nontraditional].
    * ya tradicional = long-established.

    tradicional2
    Nota: Nombre.

    Ex: The article has the title 'Things that go bump in the night: net newbies are maturing -- and making things scary for the traditionals'.

    * * *
    traditional
    mañana, como es ya tradicional, se publicará el suplemento navideño tomorrow, as has become customary, we will publish our Christmas supplement
    * * *

    tradicional adjetivo
    traditional
    tradicional adjetivo traditional
    ' tradicional' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    clásica
    - clásico
    - típica
    - típico
    - castizo
    - cuna
    English:
    fiddler
    - folk dance
    - folk music
    - old-fashioned
    - promenade concert
    - real
    - reel
    - traditional
    - wedding
    - customary
    - old
    * * *
    traditional;
    como es ya tradicional en cada partido de fútbol as has become traditional at every soccer game
    * * *
    adj traditional
    * * *
    : traditional
    * * *
    tradicional adj traditional

    Spanish-English dictionary > tradicional

  • 14 naturaleza,

    naturaleza,1 la
    1 = nature.

    Ex: Shera has reminded us that 'man abhors chaos as nature is said to abhor a vacuum', and he seeks constantly to impose a pattern on what he sees.

    * amante de la naturaleza = nature lover.
    * en la naturaleza = in the wild.
    * error de la naturaleza = freak of nature.
    * fuerza de la naturaleza = force of nature.
    * leyes de la naturaleza = nature's laws, laws of nature.
    * madre naturaleza, la = Mother Nature.
    * maravilla de la naturaleza = natural wonder.
    * milagro de la naturaleza = miracle of nature.
    * naturaleza muerta = still life.
    * que se encuentra en la naturaleza = naturally-occurring.

    Spanish-English dictionary > naturaleza,

Mira otros diccionarios:

  • abhors — ab·hor || É™b hɔː v. hate, detest, dislike …   English contemporary dictionary

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  • nature abhors a vacuum — This idiom is used to express the idea that empty or unfilled spaces are unnatural as they go against the laws of nature and physics …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • nature abhors a vacuum —    This idiom is used to express the idea that empty or unfilled spaces are unnatural as they go against the laws of nature and physics.   (Dorking School Dictionary) …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • Nature abhors a vacuum —   This idiom is used to express the idea that empty or unfilled spaces are unnatural as they go against the laws of nature and physics …   Dictionary of English idioms

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  • abhor — v. 1) (G) he abhors being idle 2) (K) she abhors his smoking * * * [əb (h)ɔː] (G) he abhors being idle (K) she abhors his smoking …   Combinatory dictionary

  • Maxims of equity — The maxims of equity evolved, in Latin and eventually translated into English, as the principles applied by courts of equity in deciding cases before them.[1] Among the traditional maxims are: Contents 1 Equity regards done what ought to be done… …   Wikipedia

  • J. Salwyn Schapiro — Jacob Salwyn Schapiro (December 19, 1879 December 30, 1973) was a Professor Emeritus of History at the City College of New York.WorkIn his book, Liberalism and the Challenge of Fascism , Schapiro set out to discuss the changes in both England and …   Wikipedia

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  • L'Engle, Madeleine — orig. Madeleine L Engle Camp born Nov. 29, 1918, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. author of children s books. L Engle pursued a career in theatre before publishing her first book, The Small Rain (1945). In A Wrinkle in Time (1962), she introduced a… …   Universalium


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