Traducción: de espanol

avid reader

  • 1 atacar

    v.
    1 to attack.
    esta enfermedad ataca el sistema respiratorio this disease attacks the respiratory system
    El general atacó al pueblo The general attacked the village.
    Ese grupo ataca siempre That group attacks always.
    2 to attack (sport).
    3 to attack.
    4 to corrode.
    5 to tackle, to attack, to try to solve.
    El grupo ataca los problemas The group tackles problems.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ SACAR], like link=sacar sacar
    1 (gen) to attack
    2 (criticar) to attack, criticize
    3 (afectar) to attack, affect
    \
    atacar los nervios to get on one's nerves
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ enemigo, ciudad, fortaleza] to attack
    2) (Med, Quím) [enfermedad, plaga, sustancia] to attack

    este niño me ataca los nervios* that child gets on my nerves *

    3) (=criticar) [+ teoría, planteamiento, propuesta] to attack
    4) (=combatir) [+ problema] to tackle, combat
    5) (=abordar)

    tengo que atacar a las matemáticas* I'll have to get stuck into my maths *

    ¿puedo atacar al pastel? — * can I get stuck into the cake? *

    2.
    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1) <país/enemigo/ideas> to attack
    2) ácido/virus/enfermedad to attack
    3)
    a) ( combatir) <problema/enfermedad> to attack
    b) ( acometer) < tarea> to tackle; < pieza musical> to launch into
    c) (Ven fam) ( cortejar) to go after
    2.
    atacar vi to attack
    * * *
    = attack, set about, assail, make + attack, bash, storm, assault, argue against, mount + attack, come under + attack, go to + bat against, maul, hit out (at/against).
    Ex. Soon afterwards he got up and wanted to attack me again.
    Ex. I shall not quickly forget being halted in full flight by the explosive entrance of a lecturer who, without pause for reflection or apology, set about an unfortunate student for not being at a tutorial.
    Ex. It's ridiculous to assail people who are making a code for abandoning all the principles which have been going strong for 100 years.
    Ex. This has led David Beminghausen in the United States to make the most outspoken attack on those who are trying to influence the role of the American Library Association.
    Ex. Newspapers took advantage of the accident to attack or ' bash' the nuclear industry or nuclear power in general.
    Ex. On October 6, 1976, an angry mob stormed the university to attack students who seemed to threaten the nation.
    Ex. Throughout history the cultural world has been assaulted in various ways which leads to the need for a process of cultural repair.
    Ex. Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex. Their aim was to mount a spirited attack on a consumer driven and marketeers' approach to reading and books, and on relativism and populism.
    Ex. This bipartite approach has recently come under heavy attack.
    Ex. The article has the title 'The minority press goes to bat against segregated baseball'.
    Ex. After being mauled by a tiger the two elephants were sedated with hydrochloride for surgical dressing of the wounds.
    Ex. She has hit out at rumours that she is a man-eater.
    ----
    * animal que ataca al hombre = man-eater.
    * atacar a = take + a swipe at, swipe, lash out at/against/on, have + a go at.
    * atacar con = urge against.
    * atacar en grupo = swarm.
    * atacar primero = preemptive strike.
    * atacar un síntoma = attack + symptom.
    * ser atacado = be under attack, come under + fire.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1) <país/enemigo/ideas> to attack
    2) ácido/virus/enfermedad to attack
    3)
    a) ( combatir) <problema/enfermedad> to attack
    b) ( acometer) < tarea> to tackle; < pieza musical> to launch into
    c) (Ven fam) ( cortejar) to go after
    2.
    atacar vi to attack
    * * *
    = attack, set about, assail, make + attack, bash, storm, assault, argue against, mount + attack, come under + attack, go to + bat against, maul, hit out (at/against).

    Ex: Soon afterwards he got up and wanted to attack me again.

    Ex: I shall not quickly forget being halted in full flight by the explosive entrance of a lecturer who, without pause for reflection or apology, set about an unfortunate student for not being at a tutorial.
    Ex: It's ridiculous to assail people who are making a code for abandoning all the principles which have been going strong for 100 years.
    Ex: This has led David Beminghausen in the United States to make the most outspoken attack on those who are trying to influence the role of the American Library Association.
    Ex: Newspapers took advantage of the accident to attack or ' bash' the nuclear industry or nuclear power in general.
    Ex: On October 6, 1976, an angry mob stormed the university to attack students who seemed to threaten the nation.
    Ex: Throughout history the cultural world has been assaulted in various ways which leads to the need for a process of cultural repair.
    Ex: Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex: Their aim was to mount a spirited attack on a consumer driven and marketeers' approach to reading and books, and on relativism and populism.
    Ex: This bipartite approach has recently come under heavy attack.
    Ex: The article has the title 'The minority press goes to bat against segregated baseball'.
    Ex: After being mauled by a tiger the two elephants were sedated with hydrochloride for surgical dressing of the wounds.
    Ex: She has hit out at rumours that she is a man-eater.
    * animal que ataca al hombre = man-eater.
    * atacar a = take + a swipe at, swipe, lash out at/against/on, have + a go at.
    * atacar con = urge against.
    * atacar en grupo = swarm.
    * atacar primero = preemptive strike.
    * atacar un síntoma = attack + symptom.
    * ser atacado = be under attack, come under + fire.

    * * *
    atacar [A2 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ‹país/enemigo› to attack
    la atacó por la espalda he attacked her from behind
    su adversario lo atacó por sorpresa his opponent caught him off guard o took him by surprise
    2 (verbalmente) ‹ideas/persona› to attack
    deja de atacarme continuamente stop attacking me o ( colloq) getting at me all the time
    B «sustancia» to attack; «virus/enfermedad» to attack
    el ácido ataca el mármol the acid attacks the marble
    ataca el sistema nervioso it attacks the nervous system
    me atacaron unos dolores de cabeza terribles I suffered o got terrible headaches
    me atacó el sueño I was suddenly overcome by sleep, I suddenly felt very sleepy
    C
    1 (combatir) ‹problema/enfermedad› to attack
    atacar las causas del problema to attack the causes of the problem
    este problema hay que atacarlo de raíz we need to attack the root of this problem
    2 (acometer) ‹tarea› to tackle; ‹pieza musical› to launch into
    3 ( Ven fam) (cortejar) to go after
    Julio está atacando a Luisa Julio's after Luisa ( colloq), Julio's trying to get Luisa to go out with him
    ■ atacar
    vi
    to attack
    ( Méx fam) (atiborrarse) atacarse DE algo; to stuff oneself WITH sth ( colloq)
    * * *

    atacar ( conjugate atacar) verbo transitivo
    to attack
    atacar verbo transitivo to attack, assault
    ♦ Locuciones: familiar atacar los nervios, to lose one's cool
    ' atacar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    cargar
    - diferente
    - arremeter
    - asaltar
    - detrás
    - disponer
    English:
    assault
    - attack
    - boot
    - charge
    - fire
    - go at
    - go for
    - hit out
    - lay into
    - savage
    - set on
    - set upon
    - strike
    - turn on
    - blast
    - blitz
    - hit
    - jump
    - lash
    - maul
    - mob
    - move
    - set
    - slam
    - tuck
    - turn
    * * *
    vt
    1. [con violencia] to attack
    2. Dep to attack
    3. [criticar] to attack;
    su propuesta fue atacada por los asistentes her proposal was attacked by those present
    4. [afectar]
    le atacó la risa/fiebre he had a fit of laughter/a bout of fever;
    me atacó el sueño I suddenly felt very sleepy
    5. [poner nervioso]
    ese ruido me ataca that noise gets on my nerves;
    su impuntualidad me ataca los nervios his unpunctuality gets on my nerves
    6. [emprender] to launch into;
    el tenor atacó el aria con entusiasmo the tenor launched into the aria with gusto;
    los ciclistas atacaron la última subida con gran energía the cyclists attacked the final climb energetically
    7. [corroer] to corrode;
    la humedad ataca los metales humidity corrodes metal
    8. [dañar] to attack;
    esta enfermedad ataca el sistema respiratorio this disease attacks the respiratory system
    9. Ven Fam [cortejar] to try to Br get off with o US make out with;
    no es el primer chico que la ataca he isn't the first boy to try to Br get off with o US make out with her
    vi
    1. [tropas, animal] to attack
    2. Dep to attack
    * * *
    I v/t
    1 attack;
    le atacó un fuerte lumbago he had a severe attack of lumbago;
    me atacaron ganas de … I was seized o gripped by a desire to …
    2 fig: tarta attack, tackle; tema address, tackle
    II v/i attack
    * * *
    atacar {72} v
    : to attack
    * * *
    atacar vb to attack

    Spanish-English dictionary > atacar

  • 2 desde un punto de vista religioso

    Ex. Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    * * *

    Ex: Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.

    Spanish-English dictionary > desde un punto de vista religioso

  • 3 débil

    adj.
    1 weak, dim, faint, feeble.
    Toda esa situación pinta mal This whole situation looks bad.
    2 atonic.
    * * *
    1 (persona) weak, feeble
    2 (ruido) faint; (luz) dim, feeble
    1 weak person
    1 the weak
    \
    débil mental mentally retarded person, mentally deficient person
    * * *
    adj.
    1) weak
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) [persona] [gen] weak; [extremadamente] feeble; [por mala salud o avanzada edad] frail

    se encuentra un poco débil de salud — his health is rather frail, he is in rather poor health

    2) [carácter] weak; [esfuerzo] feeble, half-hearted
    3) (=poco intenso) [voz, ruido] faint; [luz] dim
    2.
    SMF
    económicamente
    * * *
    a) < persona> ( físicamente) weak; ( falto de - firmeza) soft; (- voluntad) weak; <economía/ejército/gobierno> weak
    b) <sonido/voz> faint; < moneda> weak; < argumento> weak; < excusa> feeble, lame; < luz> dim, faint
    c) <sílaba/vocal> unstressed, weak
    * * *
    = powerless, flimsy [flimsier -comp., flimsiest -sup.], shaky [shakier -comp., shakiest -sup.], weak [weaker -comp., weakest -sup.], fragile, spineless, feeble, effete, faint, frail, feckless, thin [thinner -comp., thinnest -sup.], weakling, runt, nesh, weedy [weedier -comp., weediest -sup.], boneless.
    Ex. In a world divided by ideology, by trade barriers, by military threats and nuclear fears, we librarians are not powerless.
    Ex. Many paperbacks actually stand up to this usage better than the flimsy hardback covers now being produced.
    Ex. The subdivision 'Discovery and Exploration' under geographic names reinforces the popularly held notion that the world outside Western Europe had no history -- and only a shaky hold on existence -- before it was 'discovered' by Western Europeans.
    Ex. Problems arise from weak or outmoded structuring of subjects in the schedules of DC.
    Ex. The material which carries the message is fragile.
    Ex. To call a supervisor ' spineless' is to tag him as weak and therefore unfair to his really good employees.
    Ex. Mearns warns us, 'Recollection is treacherous; it is usually too broad or too narrow for another's use; and what is more serious, it is frequently undependable and worn and feeble'.
    Ex. Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex. As more and more copies are produced, so the amount of dye on the master is reduced layer by layer until the image on the copy paper becomes quite faint.
    Ex. Previous research has demonstrated that frail elderly living in subsidized high-rise apartments have greater unmet needs than elderly who reside in traditional community housing.
    Ex. The author wrings sick humor from its feckless heroes' forlorn attempts to escape from a drug habit that they do not really enjoy any longer.
    Ex. Although it may be a bit thin in its use of standard academic sources of information, it is exceedingly strong on insider information and personal interviews.
    Ex. According to Safire, when a slice a cake was put before him Putin said 'Sweets are for weaklings and children'.
    Ex. Under the same regimens of treatment the number of runts produced varied from none to as much as 80 per cent of the litter.
    Ex. Usually, half of us would sleep on the ground outside and the other half would go for the nesh option of sleeping in a tent or hut.
    Ex. Shock as boofy blokes beat weedy intellectual in popularity contest.
    Ex. By running away he shows who he is -- a boneless coward who never engaged in direct confrontation with the enemy.
    ----
    * alto y débil = spindly [spindlier -comp., spindliest -sup.].
    * débil de salud = poor health.
    * débiles, los = little guy, the.
    * en el momento más débil de Alguien = at + Posesivo + weakest.
    * eslabón débil = weak link.
    * hacerse el débil = sandbagging.
    * luz débil = glimmer.
    * más débil de la camada, el = runt of the litter, the.
    * más débil del grupo, el = runt of the litter, the.
    * punto débil = blind spot, weak link.
    * punto débil, el = chink in the armour, the.
    * ser el contrincante más débil = punch above + Posesivo + weight.
    * ser el punto más débil de Alguien = be at + Posesivo + weakest.
    * * *
    a) < persona> ( físicamente) weak; ( falto de - firmeza) soft; (- voluntad) weak; <economía/ejército/gobierno> weak
    b) <sonido/voz> faint; < moneda> weak; < argumento> weak; < excusa> feeble, lame; < luz> dim, faint
    c) <sílaba/vocal> unstressed, weak
    * * *
    = powerless, flimsy [flimsier -comp., flimsiest -sup.], shaky [shakier -comp., shakiest -sup.], weak [weaker -comp., weakest -sup.], fragile, spineless, feeble, effete, faint, frail, feckless, thin [thinner -comp., thinnest -sup.], weakling, runt, nesh, weedy [weedier -comp., weediest -sup.], boneless.

    Ex: In a world divided by ideology, by trade barriers, by military threats and nuclear fears, we librarians are not powerless.

    Ex: Many paperbacks actually stand up to this usage better than the flimsy hardback covers now being produced.
    Ex: The subdivision 'Discovery and Exploration' under geographic names reinforces the popularly held notion that the world outside Western Europe had no history -- and only a shaky hold on existence -- before it was 'discovered' by Western Europeans.
    Ex: Problems arise from weak or outmoded structuring of subjects in the schedules of DC.
    Ex: The material which carries the message is fragile.
    Ex: To call a supervisor ' spineless' is to tag him as weak and therefore unfair to his really good employees.
    Ex: Mearns warns us, 'Recollection is treacherous; it is usually too broad or too narrow for another's use; and what is more serious, it is frequently undependable and worn and feeble'.
    Ex: Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex: As more and more copies are produced, so the amount of dye on the master is reduced layer by layer until the image on the copy paper becomes quite faint.
    Ex: Previous research has demonstrated that frail elderly living in subsidized high-rise apartments have greater unmet needs than elderly who reside in traditional community housing.
    Ex: The author wrings sick humor from its feckless heroes' forlorn attempts to escape from a drug habit that they do not really enjoy any longer.
    Ex: Although it may be a bit thin in its use of standard academic sources of information, it is exceedingly strong on insider information and personal interviews.
    Ex: According to Safire, when a slice a cake was put before him Putin said 'Sweets are for weaklings and children'.
    Ex: Under the same regimens of treatment the number of runts produced varied from none to as much as 80 per cent of the litter.
    Ex: Usually, half of us would sleep on the ground outside and the other half would go for the nesh option of sleeping in a tent or hut.
    Ex: Shock as boofy blokes beat weedy intellectual in popularity contest.
    Ex: By running away he shows who he is -- a boneless coward who never engaged in direct confrontation with the enemy.
    * alto y débil = spindly [spindlier -comp., spindliest -sup.].
    * débil de salud = poor health.
    * débiles, los = little guy, the.
    * en el momento más débil de Alguien = at + Posesivo + weakest.
    * eslabón débil = weak link.
    * hacerse el débil = sandbagging.
    * luz débil = glimmer.
    * más débil de la camada, el = runt of the litter, the.
    * más débil del grupo, el = runt of the litter, the.
    * punto débil = blind spot, weak link.
    * punto débil, el = chink in the armour, the.
    * ser el contrincante más débil = punch above + Posesivo + weight.
    * ser el punto más débil de Alguien = be at + Posesivo + weakest.

    * * *
    1 ‹persona› (físicamente) weak; (falto defirmeza) soft; (— voluntad) weak; ‹economía/ejército/gobierno› weak
    es de complexión débil she has a very weak constitution
    aún está débil he's still weak
    es muy débil de carácter he has a very weak character
    2 ‹sonido/voz› faint; ‹moneda› weak; ‹corriente› weak; ‹argumento› weak; ‹excusa› feeble, lame
    da una luz muy débil it gives out a very dim o feeble o weak light
    3 ( Ling) ‹sílaba/vocal› unstressed, weak
    los débiles the weak
    es un débil mental ( fam); he's soft in the head ( colloq)
    eres un debilucho ( fam); you're a wimp ( colloq)
    los económicamente débiles ( frml); those on low incomes
    * * *

     

    débil adjetivo
    a)persona/economía/gobierno weak

    b)sonido/voz faint;

    moneda/argumento weak;
    excusa feeble, lame;
    luz dim, faint;
    sílaba/vocal unstressed, weak
    débil
    I adj (fuerza, salud) weak, feeble: el argumento era muy débil, his reasoning was flawed
    es muy débil de carácter, she is very weak
    es muy débil con sus alumnos, he is lenient with his students o he is over-indulgent with his students
    (intensidad de luz o sonido) faint
    punto débil, weak spot
    II mf
    1 weak person: el fuerte oprime al débil, the powerful opress the weak
    2 (blandengue) wimp: eres una débil, no aguantas nada el calor, don't be such a wimp, it's not even hot
    ' débil' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    A
    - alicaída
    - alicaído
    - flaca
    - flaco
    - flojear
    - goteo
    - talón
    - tenue
    - blando
    - flojo
    - lánguido
    - pelele
    - sexo
    English:
    A
    - an
    - anaemic
    - and
    - as
    - be
    - chink
    - dim
    - do
    - failing
    - faint
    - feather
    - feeble
    - frail
    - from
    - infirm
    - limp
    - link
    - shaky
    - shall
    - should
    - tenuous
    - than
    - that
    - them
    - thin
    - to
    - weak
    - were
    - what
    - whatever
    - wimp
    - wimpish
    - would
    - you
    - your
    - yourself
    - fragile
    - glimmer
    - hole
    - low
    - muted
    - run
    - spindly
    - spineless
    - weakly
    - weakness
    * * *
    adj
    1. [persona] [sin fuerzas] weak;
    [condescendiente] lax, lenient;
    de constitución débil prone to illness, sickly;
    débil de carácter of weak character
    2. [voz, sonido] faint;
    [luz] dim, faint;
    una débil mejoría a slight improvement;
    una débil brisa movía las cortinas a slight breeze moved the curtains
    3. [país, gobierno, moneda] weak;
    [argumento, teoría] weak, lame
    4. [sílaba] unstressed
    5. [vocal] weak [i, u]
    nmf
    weak person;
    ser un débil to be weak;
    una enfermedad que ataca a los más débiles a disease which attacks the weakest o most vulnerable
    * * *
    adj weak
    * * *
    débil adj
    : weak, feeble
    débilmente adv
    * * *
    débil adj
    1. (en general) weak
    2. (ruido) faint
    3. (luz) dim [comp. dimmer; superl. dimmest]

    Spanish-English dictionary > débil

  • 4 encaminar a Alguien

    (v.) = set + Nombre + on course
    Ex. The writer describes his uncomfortable experiences at grade school and high school, until a sympathetic high school librarian took an interest in him and set him on course to becoming an avid reader.
    * * *
    (v.) = set + Nombre + on course

    Ex: The writer describes his uncomfortable experiences at grade school and high school, until a sympathetic high school librarian took an interest in him and set him on course to becoming an avid reader.

    Spanish-English dictionary > encaminar a Alguien

  • 5 escuela primaria

    f.
    elementary school, primary school, grammar school, grade school.
    * * *
    (n.) = lower school, elementary school, grade school, primary school
    Ex. Many respondents would have welcomed a less theoretical syllabus with a greater allocation of class time in the lower rather than upper school.
    Ex. A small book fair lasting only a day, such as might be held in a kindergarten or small elementary school, can get by with a couple of members of staff and a parent as the organizing committee.
    Ex. The writer describes his uncomfortable experiences at grade school and high school, until a sympathetic high school librarian took an interest in him and set him on course to becoming an avid reader.
    Ex. We shall now index documents under the term 'primary school' even if this concept is only embodied in a sub-theme within them.
    * * *
    (n.) = lower school, elementary school, grade school, primary school

    Ex: Many respondents would have welcomed a less theoretical syllabus with a greater allocation of class time in the lower rather than upper school.

    Ex: A small book fair lasting only a day, such as might be held in a kindergarten or small elementary school, can get by with a couple of members of staff and a parent as the organizing committee.
    Ex: The writer describes his uncomfortable experiences at grade school and high school, until a sympathetic high school librarian took an interest in him and set him on course to becoming an avid reader.
    Ex: We shall now index documents under the term 'primary school' even if this concept is only embodied in a sub-theme within them.

    * * *
    elementary school, Br
    primary school

    Spanish-English dictionary > escuela primaria

  • 6 excesivamente beato

    Ex. Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    * * *

    Ex: Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.

    Spanish-English dictionary > excesivamente beato

  • 7 insaciable

    adj.
    insatiable.
    * * *
    1 insatiable
    * * *
    * * *
    adjetivo < apetito> insatiable; < sed> unquenchable; <afán/deseo> insatiable
    * * *
    = voracious, insatiable, greedy [greedier -comp., greediest -sup.], avid reader, avid, unquenchable.
    Ex. Technology is a voracious time consumer allowing no opportunity to assimilate the use of one development before another arrives.
    Ex. Bibliographies are one of the largest group of reference material in a library; the demand appears insatiable and publishers are aware of this.
    Ex. The author discusses whether it is possible for the scholarly community to take over scholarly publishing altogether and put greedy publishers out of business.
    Ex. In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.
    Ex. She was an avid collector of historical manuscripts considered worthless by his contemporaries and priceless by scholars today.
    Ex. Their unquenchable thirst for revenge enabled them to concoct a diabolical scheme.
    ----
    * apetito insaciable = voracious appetite.
    * lector insaciable = avid reader, voracious reader.
    * * *
    adjetivo < apetito> insatiable; < sed> unquenchable; <afán/deseo> insatiable
    * * *
    = voracious, insatiable, greedy [greedier -comp., greediest -sup.], avid reader, avid, unquenchable.

    Ex: Technology is a voracious time consumer allowing no opportunity to assimilate the use of one development before another arrives.

    Ex: Bibliographies are one of the largest group of reference material in a library; the demand appears insatiable and publishers are aware of this.
    Ex: The author discusses whether it is possible for the scholarly community to take over scholarly publishing altogether and put greedy publishers out of business.
    Ex: In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.
    Ex: She was an avid collector of historical manuscripts considered worthless by his contemporaries and priceless by scholars today.
    Ex: Their unquenchable thirst for revenge enabled them to concoct a diabolical scheme.
    * apetito insaciable = voracious appetite.
    * lector insaciable = avid reader, voracious reader.

    * * *
    ‹apetito› insatiable; ‹sed› unquenchable; ‹afán/deseo› insatiable
    * * *

    insaciable adjetivo
    insatiable;
    sed unquenchable
    insaciable adjetivo insatiable
    ' insaciable' also found in these entries:
    English:
    insatiable
    * * *
    [apetito, curiosidad] insatiable; [sed] unquenchable
    * * *
    adj insatiable
    * * *
    : insatiable

    Spanish-English dictionary > insaciable

  • 8 ir en contra de

    (v.) = contravene, fly in + the face of, go against, militate against, stand in + contrast to, tell against, be at odds with, work at + cross purposes, be at cross purposes, turn against, play against, be contrary to, run up against, work against, set against, run + counter to, run + contrary to, be at loggerheads with, argue against, stand in + sharp contrast to, speak against, run + afoul of, fall + afoul of
    Ex. Any mis-spellings, poor grammar and verbose phrasing and any other features that contravene good abstracting practice must be eliminated.
    Ex. If a planned activity flies in the face of human nature, its success will be only as great as the non-human factors can ensure.
    Ex. But since the project, development have largely gone against it, with many libraries installing their own data systems.
    Ex. Local interpretations of the rules, and modifications to suit local circumstances, certainly militate against standard records.
    Ex. To sum it up, ISBD stands in sharp contrast to the ideal of concise and clear entries followed by the founders of Anglo-American cataloging.
    Ex. What factors told against them?.
    Ex. These activities may also be at odds with processes routinely applied across the board, such as lamination.
    Ex. Libraries in developing countries may represent part of an alien cultural package, an importation ill suited to the country's needs, even working at cross purposes to the people's interests.
    Ex. These two functions of the library have often been at cross purposes to one another, because each has been associated with a conflicting view of the kind and amount of assistance to be offered to the reader.
    Ex. By imposing a ban one is only likely to set up antagonism and frustration which will turn against the very thing we are trying to encourage.
    Ex. For me a picture of myself in a dentist's waiting room is a perfect metaphor for set and setting very much in play against the easily obtained pleasures I usually get from reading.
    Ex. This is a rather unexpected conclusion, and is of course contrary to most of what has been stated in this text; it is also contrary to the experience of large numbers of librarians, who have found that controlled vocabularies are helpful in practice.
    Ex. Some of the information from the EEC Government in Brussels is provided off the record, which sometimes runs up against the UK Government's wall of secrecy.
    Ex. Which means we must create a reading environment that helps and encourages reading rather than works against it.
    Ex. Classes of children can sometimes prove to be stubbornly set against having anything to do with book introductions, and it is better then to engage them in other activities rather than be doggedly determined to have one's own way and to go on in the face of their antagonism.
    Ex. Unfortunately the Library of Congress still has a policy which runs counter to this need.
    Ex. This runs contrary to earlier user studies, particularly those of scientists and engineers, which concluded that perceived source accessibility was the overwhelming factor in source selection.
    Ex. Sharp of tongue, Watterston was often at loggerheads with the authorities, particularly the Joint Library Committee.
    Ex. Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex. To sum it up, ISBD stands in sharp contrast to the ideal of concise and clear entries followed by the founders of Anglo-American cataloging.
    Ex. As a result public libraries came into disrepute and even today authorities speak against them.
    Ex. Unfortunately for them, this approach runs afoul of Iraqi tribal customs since they are, reportedly, endogamous with respect to tribe.
    Ex. As some of her prophecies came true, she fell afoul of the authorities and was arrested by the Holy Order.
    * * *
    (v.) = contravene, fly in + the face of, go against, militate against, stand in + contrast to, tell against, be at odds with, work at + cross purposes, be at cross purposes, turn against, play against, be contrary to, run up against, work against, set against, run + counter to, run + contrary to, be at loggerheads with, argue against, stand in + sharp contrast to, speak against, run + afoul of, fall + afoul of

    Ex: Any mis-spellings, poor grammar and verbose phrasing and any other features that contravene good abstracting practice must be eliminated.

    Ex: If a planned activity flies in the face of human nature, its success will be only as great as the non-human factors can ensure.
    Ex: But since the project, development have largely gone against it, with many libraries installing their own data systems.
    Ex: Local interpretations of the rules, and modifications to suit local circumstances, certainly militate against standard records.
    Ex: To sum it up, ISBD stands in sharp contrast to the ideal of concise and clear entries followed by the founders of Anglo-American cataloging.
    Ex: What factors told against them?.
    Ex: These activities may also be at odds with processes routinely applied across the board, such as lamination.
    Ex: Libraries in developing countries may represent part of an alien cultural package, an importation ill suited to the country's needs, even working at cross purposes to the people's interests.
    Ex: These two functions of the library have often been at cross purposes to one another, because each has been associated with a conflicting view of the kind and amount of assistance to be offered to the reader.
    Ex: By imposing a ban one is only likely to set up antagonism and frustration which will turn against the very thing we are trying to encourage.
    Ex: For me a picture of myself in a dentist's waiting room is a perfect metaphor for set and setting very much in play against the easily obtained pleasures I usually get from reading.
    Ex: This is a rather unexpected conclusion, and is of course contrary to most of what has been stated in this text; it is also contrary to the experience of large numbers of librarians, who have found that controlled vocabularies are helpful in practice.
    Ex: Some of the information from the EEC Government in Brussels is provided off the record, which sometimes runs up against the UK Government's wall of secrecy.
    Ex: Which means we must create a reading environment that helps and encourages reading rather than works against it.
    Ex: Classes of children can sometimes prove to be stubbornly set against having anything to do with book introductions, and it is better then to engage them in other activities rather than be doggedly determined to have one's own way and to go on in the face of their antagonism.
    Ex: Unfortunately the Library of Congress still has a policy which runs counter to this need.
    Ex: This runs contrary to earlier user studies, particularly those of scientists and engineers, which concluded that perceived source accessibility was the overwhelming factor in source selection.
    Ex: Sharp of tongue, Watterston was often at loggerheads with the authorities, particularly the Joint Library Committee.
    Ex: Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex: To sum it up, ISBD stands in sharp contrast to the ideal of concise and clear entries followed by the founders of Anglo-American cataloging.
    Ex: As a result public libraries came into disrepute and even today authorities speak against them.
    Ex: Unfortunately for them, this approach runs afoul of Iraqi tribal customs since they are, reportedly, endogamous with respect to tribe.
    Ex: As some of her prophecies came true, she fell afoul of the authorities and was arrested by the Holy Order.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ir en contra de

  • 9 lector

    adj.
    1 reading.
    Reading instrument Instrumento lector.
    2 reading.
    m.
    1 reader, person who reads, publisher's reader.
    2 reading device, scanner, read head.
    * * *
    1 reading
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 reader
    2 EDUCACIÓN foreign language assistant
    1 TÉCNICA scanner
    \
    lector óptico optical scanner
    ————————
    1 TÉCNICA scanner
    * * *
    (f. - lectora)
    noun
    * * *
    lector, -a
    1.
    ADJ
    2. SM / F
    1) (=persona) reader
    2) (Escol, Univ) (conversation) assistant
    3.
    SM (=aparato) reader

    lector de discos compactos — CD player, compact disc player

    lector óptico de caracteres — optical character reader, optical character scanner

    * * *
    I
    - tora adjetivo reading (before n)
    II
    - tora masculino, femenino
    1) (de libros, revistas) reader
    2) (Esp) (Educ) foreign language assistant
    * * *
    = borrower, browser, library member, patron, reader, requester [requestor], scanner, user, drive.
    Ex. The intending borrower merely specifies a search key for the item he wishes to borrow, and the system provides a bibliographic description.
    Ex. Documents which will not be evident to the browser of shelves include: documents out on loan, documents which might be obtained by inter-library loan, and any collections which are kept in closed access.
    Ex. When a library member asks for a fictional book he usually frames his request in this way: 'I am looking for a book by Victor Canning'.
    Ex. The level of specificity that is desirable in any index is a function of the collection being indexed, its use and its patrons.
    Ex. A book index is an alphabetically arranged list of words or terms leading the reader to the numbers of pages on which specific topics are considered, or on which specific names appear.
    Ex. The system permits the requester to specify up to five potential lending libraries, and the system transmits the requests to these libraries one at a time.
    Ex. To read a borrower label place the scanner on the left side of the label and move it from left to right across the bar codes, pressing lightly to keep it in direct contact with the label.
    Ex. Users make suggestions for modifications and these are then channelled through a series of committees.
    Ex. Now ISI has added to its compact disc line the Social Sciences Citation Index and new, improved search software featuring multiple cd-rom drive access.
    ----
    * cabeza lectora = read head, reading head.
    * cajón del lector de CDROM = drive tray.
    * carnet de lector = library card, reader's ticket.
    * chico lector = reading-boy.
    * círculo de lectores = book club, readership.
    * club de lectores = book club.
    * comprensión lectora = reading comprehension.
    * comunidad de lectores = reader community.
    * con muchos lectores = with a wide appeal.
    * con un gran número de lectores = widely-read.
    * con varios lectores de cintas = multi-drive.
    * dispositivo para interceptar al lector = trapping.
    * encargado de orientar al lector = readers' adviser.
    * entrada de lectores = public entrance.
    * etiqueta de identificación del lector = borrower identification label.
    * etiqueta de lector = borrower label.
    * fichero de lectores = registration file.
    * hábito lector = reading habit.
    * lector al que va dirigido = intended reader.
    * lector asiduo = heavy reader.
    * lector ávido = avid reader.
    * lector con carnet = library cardholder.
    * lector de aumento = magnifying reader.
    * lector de CD-ROM = CD player, CD-ROM drive, CD-ROM player, optical disc drive, CD-ROM reader.
    * lector de cinta = tape drive.
    * lector de cinta magnética = magnetic tape drive.
    * lector de código de barras = barcode reader, barcode scanner.
    * lector de coordenadas = coordinate reader.
    * lector de disco óptico WORM = WORM optical disc drive.
    * lector de discos ópticos = optical disc drive.
    * lector de documentos = document scanner.
    * lector de DVD = DVD player.
    * lector de libros = book reader.
    * lector de microfichas = microfiche reader.
    * lector de microfilm = microfilm reader.
    * lector de microformas = microform reader, reader, viewer.
    * lector de obras literarias = literary reader.
    * lector de una biblioteca = library user.
    * lector habitual = heavy reader.
    * lector insaciable = avid reader, voracious reader.
    * lector láser = laser scanner.
    * lector moroso = blacklisted borrower.
    * lector múltiple de CD-ROM = jukebox.
    * lector óptico = optical drive, optical reader, optical scanner.
    * lector óptico de caracteres = optical character reader.
    * lector poco habitual = light reader.
    * lector voraz = avid reader, voracious reader.
    * lector WORM = WORM drive.
    * no lector = non-reader [nonreader].
    * número de lector = borrower number.
    * ordenación topográfica según los intereses del lector = reader interest arrangement.
    * pasar una tarjeta por un lector electrónico = swipe.
    * petición de documentos por el lector = document request.
    * préstamo por lector = circulation per capita.
    * salida de lectores = public exit.
    * ser lector de una biblioteca = library membership.
    * servicio de orientación al lector = readers' advisory service point, readers' advisory service.
    * servicios a lectores = readers' services.
    * sociedad de lectores = book club.
    * tapa del lector de CDROM = drive door.
    * tarjeta de lector = borrower's card, borrower's identification badge, reader's card.
    * tarjeta del lector = borrower identification label.
    * * *
    I
    - tora adjetivo reading (before n)
    II
    - tora masculino, femenino
    1) (de libros, revistas) reader
    2) (Esp) (Educ) foreign language assistant
    * * *
    = borrower, browser, library member, patron, reader, requester [requestor], scanner, user, drive.

    Ex: The intending borrower merely specifies a search key for the item he wishes to borrow, and the system provides a bibliographic description.

    Ex: Documents which will not be evident to the browser of shelves include: documents out on loan, documents which might be obtained by inter-library loan, and any collections which are kept in closed access.
    Ex: When a library member asks for a fictional book he usually frames his request in this way: 'I am looking for a book by Victor Canning'.
    Ex: The level of specificity that is desirable in any index is a function of the collection being indexed, its use and its patrons.
    Ex: A book index is an alphabetically arranged list of words or terms leading the reader to the numbers of pages on which specific topics are considered, or on which specific names appear.
    Ex: The system permits the requester to specify up to five potential lending libraries, and the system transmits the requests to these libraries one at a time.
    Ex: To read a borrower label place the scanner on the left side of the label and move it from left to right across the bar codes, pressing lightly to keep it in direct contact with the label.
    Ex: Users make suggestions for modifications and these are then channelled through a series of committees.
    Ex: Now ISI has added to its compact disc line the Social Sciences Citation Index and new, improved search software featuring multiple cd-rom drive access.
    * cabeza lectora = read head, reading head.
    * cajón del lector de CDROM = drive tray.
    * carnet de lector = library card, reader's ticket.
    * chico lector = reading-boy.
    * círculo de lectores = book club, readership.
    * club de lectores = book club.
    * comprensión lectora = reading comprehension.
    * comunidad de lectores = reader community.
    * con muchos lectores = with a wide appeal.
    * con un gran número de lectores = widely-read.
    * con varios lectores de cintas = multi-drive.
    * dispositivo para interceptar al lector = trapping.
    * encargado de orientar al lector = readers' adviser.
    * entrada de lectores = public entrance.
    * etiqueta de identificación del lector = borrower identification label.
    * etiqueta de lector = borrower label.
    * fichero de lectores = registration file.
    * hábito lector = reading habit.
    * lector al que va dirigido = intended reader.
    * lector asiduo = heavy reader.
    * lector ávido = avid reader.
    * lector con carnet = library cardholder.
    * lector de aumento = magnifying reader.
    * lector de CD-ROM = CD player, CD-ROM drive, CD-ROM player, optical disc drive, CD-ROM reader.
    * lector de cinta = tape drive.
    * lector de cinta magnética = magnetic tape drive.
    * lector de código de barras = barcode reader, barcode scanner.
    * lector de coordenadas = coordinate reader.
    * lector de disco óptico WORM = WORM optical disc drive.
    * lector de discos ópticos = optical disc drive.
    * lector de documentos = document scanner.
    * lector de DVD = DVD player.
    * lector de libros = book reader.
    * lector de microfichas = microfiche reader.
    * lector de microfilm = microfilm reader.
    * lector de microformas = microform reader, reader, viewer.
    * lector de obras literarias = literary reader.
    * lector de una biblioteca = library user.
    * lector habitual = heavy reader.
    * lector insaciable = avid reader, voracious reader.
    * lector láser = laser scanner.
    * lector moroso = blacklisted borrower.
    * lector múltiple de CD-ROM = jukebox.
    * lector óptico = optical drive, optical reader, optical scanner.
    * lector óptico de caracteres = optical character reader.
    * lector poco habitual = light reader.
    * lector voraz = avid reader, voracious reader.
    * lector WORM = WORM drive.
    * no lector = non-reader [nonreader].
    * número de lector = borrower number.
    * ordenación topográfica según los intereses del lector = reader interest arrangement.
    * pasar una tarjeta por un lector electrónico = swipe.
    * petición de documentos por el lector = document request.
    * préstamo por lector = circulation per capita.
    * salida de lectores = public exit.
    * ser lector de una biblioteca = library membership.
    * servicio de orientación al lector = readers' advisory service point, readers' advisory service.
    * servicios a lectores = readers' services.
    * sociedad de lectores = book club.
    * tapa del lector de CDROM = drive door.
    * tarjeta de lector = borrower's card, borrower's identification badge, reader's card.
    * tarjeta del lector = borrower identification label.

    * * *
    reading ( before n)
    masculine, feminine
    A (de libros, revistas) reader
    Compuestos:
    masculine biometric reader
    masculine bar code reader
    masculine DVD player
    masculine swipe card reader
    masculine digital scanner
    masculine optical scanner
    masculine optical character reader
    B ( Esp) ( Educ) foreign language assistant
    * * *

    lector
    ◊ - tora sustantivo masculino, femenino

    a) (de libros, revistas) reader


    lector,-ora
    I sustantivo masculino y femenino
    1 (persona) reader
    2 Univ (language) assistant
    II sustantivo masculino (aparato) reader
    lector de (discos) compactos, CD player
    ' lector' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    devota
    - devoto
    - lectora
    - asiduo
    - habitual
    - remitir
    English:
    assistant
    - avid
    - lay
    - reader
    - regular
    * * *
    lector, -ora
    adj
    reading;
    el público lector the reading public
    nm,f
    1. [de libros] reader;
    los lectores de esta revista our readers o readership
    2. Esp Educ language assistant
    nm
    [aparato] reader Informát lector de CD-ROM CD-ROM drive;
    lector de código de barras bar-code scanner o reader;
    Informát lector de disco compacto compact disc player;
    lector de DVD DVD player;
    Informát lector óptico optical scanner; Informát lector óptico de caracteres optical character reader;
    lector de tarjetas magnéticas magnetic card reader
    * * *
    m, lectora f
    1 reader
    2 EDU language assistant
    * * *
    lector, - tora adj
    : reading
    nivel lector: reading level
    lector, - tora n
    : reader
    lector nm
    : scanner, reader
    lectoróptico: optical scanner
    * * *
    lector n reader

    Spanish-English dictionary > lector

  • 10 lector insaciable

    (n.) = avid reader, voracious reader
    Ex. In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.
    Ex. Although this public takes most of the adult books, it seems to consist of a small number of voracious readers.
    * * *
    (n.) = avid reader, voracious reader

    Ex: In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.

    Ex: Although this public takes most of the adult books, it seems to consist of a small number of voracious readers.

    Spanish-English dictionary > lector insaciable

  • 11 lector voraz

    (n.) = avid reader, voracious reader
    Ex. In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.
    Ex. Although this public takes most of the adult books, it seems to consist of a small number of voracious readers.
    * * *
    (n.) = avid reader, voracious reader

    Ex: In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.

    Ex: Although this public takes most of the adult books, it seems to consist of a small number of voracious readers.

    Spanish-English dictionary > lector voraz

  • 12 lector ávido

    (adj.) = avid reader
    Ex. In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.
    * * *
    (adj.) = avid reader

    Ex: In fact only very avid readers will ever settle to silent reading immediately on arrival from some different activity.

    Spanish-English dictionary > lector ávido

  • 13 oponerse a

    v.
    1 to oppose, to balk at, to fight, to act in opposition to.
    María enfrentó a la chismosa Mary confronted the gossip.
    2 to be opposed to, to refuse to.
    * * *
    (v.) = be averse to, combat, contravene, resist, be set against, be contrary to, be hostile to, stand up to, argue against, go + head-to-head with, be negatively disposed to, object to, stand in + opposition to, run up against, line up against
    Ex. Some respondents were not averse to describing IT merely as another bandwagon.
    Ex. The faithful adherents of the ideology of the finding catalog were determined to combat the unwelcome intrusion of Panizzi's scheme before the Royal Commission.
    Ex. Any mis-spellings, poor grammar and verbose phrasing and any other features that contravene good abstracting practice must be eliminated.
    Ex. Abstracts are, it must be noted, covered by copyright provisions, and an author may resist direct copying of his abstract.
    Ex. The difficulty for teachers is that they cannot just duck away when children, individually or corporately, are set against what is being asked of them.
    Ex. This is a rather unexpected conclusion, and is of course contrary to most of what has been stated in this text; it is also contrary to the experience of large numbers of librarians, who have found that controlled vocabularies are helpful in practice.
    Ex. Although he recognized the need for some forms of synthesis, Bliss was hostile to the idea of complete analysis and synthesis put forward by Ranganathan.
    Ex. In their role as mediator between the scholar and the information system, academic librarians should stand up to, and challenge the censorship and suppression that takes place during academic controversy.
    Ex. Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex. We went head-to-head with those that wanted a uniform look for the whole library Website! = Nos enfrentamos a aquellos que querían un aspecto uniforme en el diseño de todo el sitio web de la biblioteca.
    Ex. The 2 remaining teachers -- the resisters -- were negatively disposed to the innovations and failed to implement them.
    Ex. In one library, the director objected to the category heading 'Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender' = En una biblioteca, el director se opuso a que se utilizase la categoría "Gay, Lesbiana, Bisexual y Transexual".
    Ex. Ideologies stand in opposition to scientific claims for truth.
    Ex. Some of the information from the EEC Government in Brussels is provided off the record, which sometimes runs up against the UK Government's wall of secrecy.
    Ex. The author examines claims by Microsoft's Bill Gates that networked computers have no future, and looks at the opposition lining up against him.
    * * *
    (v.) = be averse to, combat, contravene, resist, be set against, be contrary to, be hostile to, stand up to, argue against, go + head-to-head with, be negatively disposed to, object to, stand in + opposition to, run up against, line up against

    Ex: Some respondents were not averse to describing IT merely as another bandwagon.

    Ex: The faithful adherents of the ideology of the finding catalog were determined to combat the unwelcome intrusion of Panizzi's scheme before the Royal Commission.
    Ex: Any mis-spellings, poor grammar and verbose phrasing and any other features that contravene good abstracting practice must be eliminated.
    Ex: Abstracts are, it must be noted, covered by copyright provisions, and an author may resist direct copying of his abstract.
    Ex: The difficulty for teachers is that they cannot just duck away when children, individually or corporately, are set against what is being asked of them.
    Ex: This is a rather unexpected conclusion, and is of course contrary to most of what has been stated in this text; it is also contrary to the experience of large numbers of librarians, who have found that controlled vocabularies are helpful in practice.
    Ex: Although he recognized the need for some forms of synthesis, Bliss was hostile to the idea of complete analysis and synthesis put forward by Ranganathan.
    Ex: In their role as mediator between the scholar and the information system, academic librarians should stand up to, and challenge the censorship and suppression that takes place during academic controversy.
    Ex: Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    Ex: We went head-to-head with those that wanted a uniform look for the whole library Website! = Nos enfrentamos a aquellos que querían un aspecto uniforme en el diseño de todo el sitio web de la biblioteca.
    Ex: The 2 remaining teachers -- the resisters -- were negatively disposed to the innovations and failed to implement them.
    Ex: In one library, the director objected to the category heading 'Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender' = En una biblioteca, el director se opuso a que se utilizase la categoría "Gay, Lesbiana, Bisexual y Transexual".
    Ex: Ideologies stand in opposition to scientific claims for truth.
    Ex: Some of the information from the EEC Government in Brussels is provided off the record, which sometimes runs up against the UK Government's wall of secrecy.
    Ex: The author examines claims by Microsoft's Bill Gates that networked computers have no future, and looks at the opposition lining up against him.

    Spanish-English dictionary > oponerse a

  • 14 religiosamente

    adv.
    religiously (also figurative).
    * * *
    1 religiously
    * * *
    * * *
    adverbio religiously
    * * *
    = faithfully, religiously.
    Ex. Many long-term residents feel that Junctionville should be governed the way it was before Groome appeared -- by 'good old boys' who had worked their way up, who eschewed issues, and who faithfully rewarded their cronies.
    Ex. Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.
    * * *
    adverbio religiously
    * * *
    = faithfully, religiously.

    Ex: Many long-term residents feel that Junctionville should be governed the way it was before Groome appeared -- by 'good old boys' who had worked their way up, who eschewed issues, and who faithfully rewarded their cronies.

    Ex: Some teachers argue against book clubs, claiming that they bring together only a certain kind of avid reader, the literary equivalent of the religiously effete and over-pious.

    * * *
    religiously
    escribe religiosamente todas las semanas she writes religiously every week
    * * *
    religiously;
    paga religiosamente sus facturas he pays his bills religiously
    * * *
    adv religiously
    * * *
    : religiously, faithfully

    Spanish-English dictionary > religiosamente

  • 15 voraz

    adj.
    1 voracious (persona, apetito).
    2 raging.
    * * *
    adjetivo (pl voraces)
    1 voracious
    2 figurado fierce, raging
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=devorador) voracious, ravenous; pey greedy
    2) [fuego] raging, fierce
    3) (Méx) (=audaz) bold
    * * *
    adjetivo <persona/animal/apetito> voracious; <incendio/fuego> fierce
    * * *
    = voracious, omnivorous, rapacious, ravenous.
    Ex. Technology is a voracious time consumer allowing no opportunity to assimilate the use of one development before another arrives.
    Ex. Given this expertise, reference librarians who are dedicated generalists with comprehensive and omnivorous interests and knowledge provide the best reference service.
    Ex. Golf courses are emerging as one of the most environmentally rapacious and socially divisive forms of tourist and property development.
    Ex. You read him to the end with a ravenous appetite and rise from the feast with an unaccountable sense of emptiness.
    ----
    * apetito voraz = voracious appetite.
    * lector voraz = avid reader, voracious reader.
    * * *
    adjetivo <persona/animal/apetito> voracious; <incendio/fuego> fierce
    * * *
    = voracious, omnivorous, rapacious, ravenous.

    Ex: Technology is a voracious time consumer allowing no opportunity to assimilate the use of one development before another arrives.

    Ex: Given this expertise, reference librarians who are dedicated generalists with comprehensive and omnivorous interests and knowledge provide the best reference service.
    Ex: Golf courses are emerging as one of the most environmentally rapacious and socially divisive forms of tourist and property development.
    Ex: You read him to the end with a ravenous appetite and rise from the feast with an unaccountable sense of emptiness.
    * apetito voraz = voracious appetite.
    * lector voraz = avid reader, voracious reader.

    * * *
    1 ‹persona/animal/apetito› voracious
    siempre fue un lector voraz he always was an avid o a voracious reader
    2 ‹llamas/incendio/fuego› fierce
    * * *

    voraz adjetivo ‹persona/animal/apetito voracious;
    incendio/fuego fierce
    voraz adjetivo voracious
    (el fuego) fierce
    ' voraz' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ansioso
    English:
    avid
    - voracious
    * * *
    voraz adj
    1. [persona, apetito] voracious
    2. [fuego, enfermedad] raging
    * * *
    adj voracious; incendio fierce
    * * *
    voraz adj, pl voraces : voracious
    vorazmente adv

    Spanish-English dictionary > voraz

  • 16 ávido

    adj.
    1 avid, eager, hungering.
    2 avid, greedy.
    * * *
    1 avid, eager
    * * *
    (f. - ávida)
    adj.
    eager, avid
    * * *
    ADJ (=entusiasta) avid, eager (de for)
    (=codicioso) greedy (de for)
    * * *
    - da adjetivo

    ávido de algode noticias/aventuras eager for something; de poder hungry for something

    * * *
    = avid.
    Ex. She was an avid collector of historical manuscripts considered worthless by his contemporaries and priceless by scholars today.
    ----
    * lector ávido = avid reader.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo

    ávido de algode noticias/aventuras eager for something; de poder hungry for something

    * * *
    = avid.

    Ex: She was an avid collector of historical manuscripts considered worthless by his contemporaries and priceless by scholars today.

    * lector ávido = avid reader.

    * * *
    ávido -da
    ávido DE algo eager FOR sth
    ávido de noticias/nuevas aventuras eager for news/for new adventures
    ávido de sabiduría thirsty o greedy for knowledge
    * * *

    ávido
    ◊ -da adjetivo ávido de algo ‹de noticias/aventuras› eager for sth;


    de poder› hungry for sth
    ávido,-a adjetivo avid: estamos ávidos de saber y de paz, we are thirsty for knowledge and peace
    ' ávido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ávida
    English:
    avid
    - greedy
    - hungry
    * * *
    ávido, -a adj
    [lector] avid; [coleccionista] keen;
    es una persona ávida de información he's someone with a thirst for information;
    un artista ávido de fama an artist who is hungry for fame
    * * *
    adj eager (de for), avid (de for)
    * * *
    ávido, -da adj
    : eager, avid
    ávidamente adv

    Spanish-English dictionary > ávido

  • 17 deambular

    v.
    1 to wander (about).
    2 to wander around, to gad, to wander, to idle around.
    * * *
    1 to saunter, stroll
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo to wander around o about
    * * *
    = walk (a)round, wander about, meander, roam (about/around), wander around, range, wander, rove.
    Ex. He got up, and, putting hands in the pockets of his trousers, began to walk around the room.
    Ex. He was a loner himself, a small-town country boy who spent most of his time wandering about the hills and fields near his home.
    Ex. They are mixed up as the talk meanders about, apparently without conscious pattern.
    Ex. Unless children are given time to roam about unhindered among books of many kinds, left alone to choose for themselves, and to do what any avid adult reader does, then maybe we labor in vain.
    Ex. The audience can wander around at will and discuss with contributors and each other.
    Ex. We will be bringing scholars from all over the world both to range widely in our multiform collections and put things together rather than just take them apart.
    Ex. The article is entitled ' Wandering the Web: further developments on the global information bazaar'.
    Ex. The production is extremely lively: Wandering musicians rove the tiny stage and aisles, competing with birdsong and baroque concertos over the tannoy.
    ----
    * deambular libremente = wander + at large, roam + free.
    * deambular por = perambulate about.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo to wander around o about
    * * *
    = walk (a)round, wander about, meander, roam (about/around), wander around, range, wander, rove.

    Ex: He got up, and, putting hands in the pockets of his trousers, began to walk around the room.

    Ex: He was a loner himself, a small-town country boy who spent most of his time wandering about the hills and fields near his home.
    Ex: They are mixed up as the talk meanders about, apparently without conscious pattern.
    Ex: Unless children are given time to roam about unhindered among books of many kinds, left alone to choose for themselves, and to do what any avid adult reader does, then maybe we labor in vain.
    Ex: The audience can wander around at will and discuss with contributors and each other.
    Ex: We will be bringing scholars from all over the world both to range widely in our multiform collections and put things together rather than just take them apart.
    Ex: The article is entitled ' Wandering the Web: further developments on the global information bazaar'.
    Ex: The production is extremely lively: Wandering musicians rove the tiny stage and aisles, competing with birdsong and baroque concertos over the tannoy.
    * deambular libremente = wander + at large, roam + free.
    * deambular por = perambulate about.

    * * *
    deambular [A1 ]
    vi
    to roam, wander around o about
    * * *

    deambular ( conjugate deambular) verbo intransitivo
    to wander around o about
    deambular verbo intransitivo to saunter, stroll
    ' deambular' also found in these entries:
    English:
    amble
    - wander
    - meander
    - roam
    * * *
    to wander (about o around);
    deambular por el centro de la ciudad to wander round Br the city centre o US downtown;
    deambulaba por la casa sin saber qué hacer he wandered around the house without knowing what to do
    * * *
    v/i wander around
    * * *
    : to wander, to roam
    * * *
    deambular vb to wander

    Spanish-English dictionary > deambular

  • 18 desplazarse librevemente

    (v.) = roam (about/around)
    Ex. Unless children are given time to roam about unhindered among books of many kinds, left alone to choose for themselves, and to do what any avid adult reader does, then maybe we labor in vain.
    * * *
    (v.) = roam (about/around)

    Ex: Unless children are given time to roam about unhindered among books of many kinds, left alone to choose for themselves, and to do what any avid adult reader does, then maybe we labor in vain.

    Spanish-English dictionary > desplazarse librevemente

  • 19 errar

    v.
    1 to choose wrongly.
    2 to wander.
    3 to make a mistake.
    María erró en sus cálculos Mary made a mistake in her calculations.
    4 to miss.
    5 to mistake, to miss, to fail, to miscalculate.
    María erró sus cálculos Mary mistook her calculations.
    6 to go astray, to err from the path of righteousness.
    El huérfano erró The orphan went astray.
    7 to roam around, to ramble, to roam about.
    * * *
    (e changes to ye in stressed syllables)
    Present Indicative
    yerro/ yerras/ yerra, erramos, erráis, yerran.
    Present Subjunctive
    yerre, yerres, yerre, erremos, erréis, yerren.
    Imperative
    yerra (tú), yerre (él/Vd.), erremos (nos.), errad (vos.), yerren (ellos/Vds.).
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=equivocar) [+ tiro] to miss with, aim badly; [+ blanco] to miss; [+ vocación] to miss, mistake
    2) [en obligación] to fail ( in one's duty to)
    2. VI
    1) (=vagar) to wander, rove
    2) (=equivocarse) to be mistaken

    errar es cosa humana, de los hombres es errar — to err is human

    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo <tiro/golpe> to miss

    erró su vocación — she chose the wrong vocation/career

    2.
    errar vi
    1) ( fallar)

    (le) erré otra vezmissed again! (colloq), I've missed again

    le erraste feo — (RPl fam) you were way out o off the mark (colloq)

    2) (liter) persona ( vagar) to wander, roam; mirada/imaginación to wander
    * * *
    = miss + the mark, ramble, err, roam (about/around), mistake, range, rove, miss + the point.
    Ex. Such considerations suggest that exhortations directed at SLIS to transform their curricula in unspecified radical fashion miss the mark.
    Ex. Because by now comparative librarianship has a well-developed methodology, he does not have to waste his effort by rambling.
    Ex. Wherein had she erred? Try as she might she could think of nothing.
    Ex. Unless children are given time to roam about unhindered among books of many kinds, left alone to choose for themselves, and to do what any avid adult reader does, then maybe we labor in vain.
    Ex. A flat 'no' to a question such as 'Is this book recommended for Professor Shaw's course?' leaves uncertainty as to whether one was mistaken in the professor or in the suggestion that it was for a course.
    Ex. We will be bringing scholars from all over the world both to range widely in our multiform collections and put things together rather than just take them apart.
    Ex. The production is extremely lively: Wandering musicians rove the tiny stage and aisles, competing with birdsong and baroque concertos over the tannoy.
    Ex. Even those states who are pushing for legalized sports betting are missing the point when it comes to making a profit through sports betting.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo <tiro/golpe> to miss

    erró su vocación — she chose the wrong vocation/career

    2.
    errar vi
    1) ( fallar)

    (le) erré otra vezmissed again! (colloq), I've missed again

    le erraste feo — (RPl fam) you were way out o off the mark (colloq)

    2) (liter) persona ( vagar) to wander, roam; mirada/imaginación to wander
    * * *
    = miss + the mark, ramble, err, roam (about/around), mistake, range, rove, miss + the point.

    Ex: Such considerations suggest that exhortations directed at SLIS to transform their curricula in unspecified radical fashion miss the mark.

    Ex: Because by now comparative librarianship has a well-developed methodology, he does not have to waste his effort by rambling.
    Ex: Wherein had she erred? Try as she might she could think of nothing.
    Ex: Unless children are given time to roam about unhindered among books of many kinds, left alone to choose for themselves, and to do what any avid adult reader does, then maybe we labor in vain.
    Ex: A flat 'no' to a question such as 'Is this book recommended for Professor Shaw's course?' leaves uncertainty as to whether one was mistaken in the professor or in the suggestion that it was for a course.
    Ex: We will be bringing scholars from all over the world both to range widely in our multiform collections and put things together rather than just take them apart.
    Ex: The production is extremely lively: Wandering musicians rove the tiny stage and aisles, competing with birdsong and baroque concertos over the tannoy.
    Ex: Even those states who are pushing for legalized sports betting are missing the point when it comes to making a profit through sports betting.

    * * *
    errar [ A26 ]
    vt
    ‹tiro/golpe› to miss
    erró el remate he missed the shot, he shot wide/high
    erró su vocación she chose the wrong vocation/career
    ■ errar
    vi
    A
    (fallar): (le) erré otra vez missed again! ( colloq), I've missed again
    erró en su decisión he was mistaken in his decision, he made the wrong decision
    le erraste feo ( RPl fam); you were way out o way off the mark ( colloq), you were miles out ( colloq)
    errar es humano to err is human
    B ( liter); «persona» (vagar) to wander, roam, rove ( liter); «mirada» to wander
    su imaginación erraba por lugares lejanos his thoughts wandered o drifted o strayed to far-off places
    * * *

    errar ( conjugate errar) verbo transitivotiro/golpe to miss;
    erró su vocación she chose the wrong vocation/career

    verbo intransitivo [ tirador] to miss;
    erró en su decisión he made the wrong decision
    errar
    I verbo transitivo
    1 (un tiro, golpe) to miss
    2 (una elección) to get wrong
    II verbo intransitivo
    1 (vagar) to wander
    2 (cometer fallos) to make a mistake

    ' errar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    equivocarse
    - engañar
    - fallar
    - tiro
    - yerra
    English:
    aimlessly
    - err
    - miss
    - muff
    - roam
    * * *
    vt
    1. [tiro, golpe] to miss
    2. [no acertar en]
    errar el cálculo/la respuesta to get the figures/answer wrong;
    errar el rumbo to choose the wrong course;
    errar la vocación to mistake one's vocation;
    RP
    le erraron con el diagnóstico he was misdiagnosed;
    RP Fam
    errar el biscochazo to be wide of the mark
    vi
    1. [vagar] [persona, imaginación, mirada] to wander;
    erró de pueblo en pueblo she wandered from town to town
    2. [equivocarse] to make a mistake;
    erró en la elección de carrera he chose the wrong course;
    RP
    errarle to make a mistake;
    le erré en las cuentas I made a mistake in the accounts;
    le erró, no le tendría que haber dicho nada he made a mistake, he shouldn't have told him anything
    3. [al tirar] to miss
    * * *
    I v/t miss;
    errar el tiro/golpe miss;
    errar el cálculo miscalculate, make a mistake in one’s figures
    II v/i miss;
    errar es humano to err is human
    * * *
    errar {32} vt
    fallar: to miss
    errar vi
    1) desacertar: to be wrong, to be mistaken
    2) vagar: to wander
    * * *
    errar vb
    1. (fallar) to miss
    2. (equivocarse) to be wrong
    3. (vagar) to wander

    Spanish-English dictionary > errar

  • 20 reflexionar

    v.
    to reflect.
    * * *
    1 to reflect ( sobre, on), think ( sobre, about)
    * * *
    verb
    to reflect, think
    * * *
    1.
    VT to reflect on, think about, think over
    2.
    VI (=considerar) to reflect ( sobre on)
    [antes de actuar] to think, pause

    ¡reflexione! — you think about it!, think for a moment!

    * * *
    verbo intransitivo to reflect (frml)

    ¿has reflexionado bien? — have you thought it over o through carefully?

    reflexionar SOBRE algo — to think about something, reflect on something (frml)

    * * *
    = ponder (over/on/upon), cogitate, elaborate + thoughts on, mull over, give + (some) thought to, take + a step back, step back.
    Ex. If we instruct it to ponder this question more leisurely, it will quickly try the user's patience with digressions concerning the less illustrious senior MOZART, LEOPOLD.
    Ex. 'We've been loading quite a few things on you, Laura! Do you have any questions?', the young woman cogitated.
    Ex. It does not help to further elaborate thoughts on what a national library is.
    Ex. Hawthorne sat alone at her table, mulling over Gordon's remarks = Hawthorne estaba sentado solo en su mesa, dándole vueltas a los comentarios de Gordon.
    Ex. I encourage the reader to give thought to the longer case studies that have appeared in the library press.
    Ex. To make sure why we believe it important to bring up children as willing, avid, responsive readers of literature we have to take a step back and sort out why literature is important to ourselves.
    Ex. Before that, however, let us step back for a moment and look at the total picture from the user's point of view.
    ----
    * detenerse a reflexionar = stand back.
    * hacer reflexionar = food for thought.
    * que hacer reflexionar = provocative of.
    * reflexionar sobre = reflect (on), take + stock of, muse (over/on/upon).
    * si nos detenemos a reflexionar sobre ello = on reflection.
    * sin reflexionar = rashly.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo to reflect (frml)

    ¿has reflexionado bien? — have you thought it over o through carefully?

    reflexionar SOBRE algo — to think about something, reflect on something (frml)

    * * *
    reflexionar (sobre)
    (v.) = reflect (on), take + stock of, muse (over/on/upon)

    Ex: However, reflect that every character or form of heading which might feature in a catalogue or index must have a uniquely defined place in a sequence.

    Ex: The conference took stock of development within information technology, outlined new ways for its use and presented projects.
    Ex: The next morning, library director Nicholas R. Magro, sat in his office musing over the previous evening's activities = A la mañana siguiente, el director de la biblioteca se sentó en su despacho reflexionando sobre las actividades que se habían realizado el día anterior por la tarde.

    = ponder (over/on/upon), cogitate, elaborate + thoughts on, mull over, give + (some) thought to, take + a step back, step back.

    Ex: If we instruct it to ponder this question more leisurely, it will quickly try the user's patience with digressions concerning the less illustrious senior MOZART, LEOPOLD.

    Ex: 'We've been loading quite a few things on you, Laura! Do you have any questions?', the young woman cogitated.
    Ex: It does not help to further elaborate thoughts on what a national library is.
    Ex: Hawthorne sat alone at her table, mulling over Gordon's remarks = Hawthorne estaba sentado solo en su mesa, dándole vueltas a los comentarios de Gordon.
    Ex: I encourage the reader to give thought to the longer case studies that have appeared in the library press.
    Ex: To make sure why we believe it important to bring up children as willing, avid, responsive readers of literature we have to take a step back and sort out why literature is important to ourselves.
    Ex: Before that, however, let us step back for a moment and look at the total picture from the user's point of view.
    * detenerse a reflexionar = stand back.
    * hacer reflexionar = food for thought.
    * que hacer reflexionar = provocative of.
    * reflexionar sobre = reflect (on), take + stock of, muse (over/on/upon).
    * si nos detenemos a reflexionar sobre ello = on reflection.
    * sin reflexionar = rashly.

    * * *
    vi
    to reflect ( frml)
    reflexiona antes de tomar una decisión think about it o reflect on it before you make a decision
    ¿has reflexionado bien? have you thought it over o through fully?
    no reflexiona she doesn't think (about things)
    tomó la decisión sin reflexionar she took the decision without thinking
    reflexionar SOBRE algo to think ABOUT sth, reflect ON sth ( frml)
    he estado reflexionando sobre lo que dijo I've been thinking about o reflecting on what you said, I've given some thought to what you said
    * * *

     

    reflexionar ( conjugate reflexionar) verbo intransitivo
    to reflect (frml);
    ¿has reflexionado bien? have you thought it over o through carefully?;

    reflexionar SOBRE algo to think about sth, reflect on sth (frml)
    reflexionar
    I verbo intransitivo to reflect
    reflexionar sobre algo, to think about o reflect on sthg
    II verbo transitivo to think about, consider: reflexiónalo con calma, think about it carefully

    ' reflexionar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    meditate
    - mull
    - reflect
    - thought-provoking
    - muse
    - thought
    * * *
    vi
    to think ( sobre about), to reflect ( sobre on);
    reflexiona bien antes de tomar una decisión think carefully before taking a decision;
    actuó sin reflexionar she acted without thinking
    vt
    to think about, to consider
    * * *
    v/t reflect on, ponder
    * * *
    : to reflect, to think
    * * *
    reflexionar vb to reflect / to think about [pt. & pp. thought]
    después de mucho reflexionar, decidió estudiar arquitectura after thinking about it long and hard, he decided to study architecture

    Spanish-English dictionary > reflexionar

Mira otros diccionarios:

  • avid reader — one who enjoys reading, bookworm , one who loves to read …   English contemporary dictionary

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  • avid — [[t]æ̱vɪd[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: usu ADJ n You use avid to describe someone who is very enthusiastic about something that they do. He misses not having enough books because he s an avid reader. ...an avid collector of art and history. Derived words …   English dictionary

  • reader — [[t]ri͟ːdə(r)[/t]] ♦♦ readers 1) N COUNT The readers of a newspaper, magazine, or book are the people who read it. If you are a regular reader of Homes & Gardens you will know what an invaluable source of inspiration it is... These texts give the …   English dictionary

  • reader — noun (C) 1 someone who reads a particular book, newspaper etc: At this point in the novel, the reader still does not know the hero s true identity. | a Guardian reader 2 someone who reads a lot, or reads in a particular way: an avid reader |… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • reader */*/*/ — UK [ˈriːdə(r)] / US [ˈrɪdər] noun [countable] Word forms reader : singular reader plural readers 1) someone who reads, especially someone who reads a particular newspaper, book, or magazine The books provide the reader with an introduction to… …   English dictionary

  • reader — read|er W2S3 [ˈri:də US ər] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(somebody who reads)¦ 2¦(of a newspaper/magazine)¦ 3¦(book)¦ 4¦(teacher)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1.) ¦(SOMEBODY WHO READS)¦ someone who reads books, or who reads in a particular way ▪ The book will appeal to young readers …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • reader — read|er [ ridər ] noun count *** ▸ 1 someone who reads ▸ 2 electronic equipment ▸ 3 book for learning ▸ 4 teacher at university ▸ 5 lay reader in church 1. ) someone who reads, especially someone who reads a particular newspaper, book, or… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • avid — /ˈævəd / (say avuhd) adjective 1. keenly desirous; eager; greedy: an avid reader; *He was so avid for gossip about the activities of his fellows that she had formed the habit of making mental notes of all that she saw and heard –martin boyd, 1946 …   Australian English dictionary

  • avid — av|id [ˈævıd] adj [only before noun] [Date: 1700 1800; : French; Origin: avide, from Latin avidus, from avere; AVARICE] doing something as much as possible = ↑keen ▪ an avid collector of old jazz records ▪ an avid reader …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • avid — adjective avid reader/listener/fan etc someone who does something, listens to something etc as much as they can: an avid collector of old jazz records …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English


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