Traducción: de espanol

unsparing

  • 1 brutalmente

    adv.
    brutally, currishly, churlishly, brutishly.
    * * *
    1 brutally
    * * *
    * * *
    = brutally, ferociously, heinously.
    Ex. These two extraordinary, brutally honest autobiographical works deal with Spiegelman's attempts to record his father's recollections of experiences in the Nazi death camps.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. They felt this sick feeling then that we are now experiencing when one of their own was heinously attacked.
    * * *
    = brutally, ferociously, heinously.

    Ex: These two extraordinary, brutally honest autobiographical works deal with Spiegelman's attempts to record his father's recollections of experiences in the Nazi death camps.

    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: They felt this sick feeling then that we are now experiencing when one of their own was heinously attacked.

    * * *
    brutally
    * * *
    brutally

    Spanish-English dictionary > brutalmente

  • 2 con ferocidad

    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    * * *

    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.

    Spanish-English dictionary > con ferocidad

  • 3 despiadado

    adj.
    merciless, cruel, inhuman, cold-hearted.
    * * *
    1 ruthless, merciless
    * * *
    (f. - despiadada)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [persona] heartless; [ataque] merciless
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.
    Ex. For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex. The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex. The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex. Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex. Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex. One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex. However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex. Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    ----
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo < persona> ruthless, heartless; <ataque/crítica> savage, merciless
    * * *
    = hard-hearted, relentless, savage, ruthless, remorseless, implacable, inexorable, cold-blooded, ferocius, unsparing, merciless, soulless, ferocious, heartless, cutthroat, unforgiving.

    Ex: For her refusal, Isabella has received a great deal of blame from subsequent critics, who call her a hard-hearted prude.

    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The most vulnerable nations are Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, which have all experienced savage war and civil unrest in recent years.
    Ex: The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex: The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: He was a cold-blooded killer, cardsharp, gambler and a consumptive who also ran several confidence scams.
    Ex: Fuller's novel make for a form of intellectual clarity, even if that clarity, paradoxically, is expressed in a ferocious hell-bent manner.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: The author discusses art critic Harry Quilter, usually remembered today as 'Arry,' the butt of merciless lampooning by J.M. Whistler.
    Ex: Our deliberate and passionate ambition is to avoid the traps of soulless, dead villages turned into museums, slowly sinking into oblivion.
    Ex: One by one, he wiped the floor with opponents who had spoken in the debate -- with a ferocious blend of rant, rhetoric and rumbustious counterattack.
    Ex: However, I knew there was a problem when I actually cared more about the relationship between the secondary characters of Josh McCool, heartless flunky of Warren's, and Mia.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    Ex: Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    * actuar de un modo despiadado = play + hardball.
    * ser despiadado = play + hardball.

    * * *
    ‹persona› ruthless, heartless; ‹ataque/crítica› savage, merciless
    * * *

    despiadado
    ◊ -da adjetivo ‹ persona ruthless, heartless;


    ataque/crítica savage, merciless
    despiadado,-a adjetivo merciless, ruthless
    ' despiadado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    acerba
    - acerbo
    - bárbara
    - bárbaro
    - despiadada
    English:
    cold-blooded
    - cold-hearted
    - cutthroat
    - merciless
    - pitiless
    - remorseless
    - ruthless
    - unmerciful
    - vicious
    - cold
    * * *
    despiadado, -a adj
    [persona] merciless; [trato] inhuman, pitiless; [ataque] savage, merciless
    * * *
    adj ruthless
    * * *
    despiadado, -da adj
    cruel: cruel, merciless, pitiless
    * * *
    despiadado adj hard-hearted / heartless / ruthless

    Spanish-English dictionary > despiadado

  • 4 ferozmente

    adv.
    ferociously, folly, savagely.
    * * *
    1 fiercely, ferociously
    * * *
    ADV
    1) (=salvajemente) fiercely, ferociously
    2) (=cruelmente) cruelly
    * * *
    = fiercely, ferociously.
    Ex. Whether libraries are entirely suitable for extending their role into community information and advice has been fiercely debated.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    * * *
    = fiercely, ferociously.

    Ex: Whether libraries are entirely suitable for extending their role into community information and advice has been fiercely debated.

    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.

    * * *
    fiercely, ferociously
    * * *
    ferociously, fiercely

    Spanish-English dictionary > ferozmente

  • 5 implacable

    adj.
    implacable, relentless.
    * * *
    1 implacable, relentless
    * * *
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ implacable, relentless
    * * *
    a) <odio/furia> implacable; <avance/lucha> relentless; < sol> relentless
    b) <juez/crítico> implacable
    c) <enemigo/contrincante> ruthless
    * * *
    = unrelenting, relentless, ruthless, remorseless, unforgiving, bitter, implacable, inexorable, nagging, unsparing, cutthroat.
    Nota: Adjetivo.
    Ex. Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.
    Ex. They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex. The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex. The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex. Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    Ex. The author notes the work of Melvyl Dewey in espousing library education and the bitter opposition from some library leaders.
    Ex. The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex. The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex. With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    ----
    * actuar de un modo implacable = play + hardball.
    * ser implacable = play + hardball.
    * * *
    a) <odio/furia> implacable; <avance/lucha> relentless; < sol> relentless
    b) <juez/crítico> implacable
    c) <enemigo/contrincante> ruthless
    * * *
    = unrelenting, relentless, ruthless, remorseless, unforgiving, bitter, implacable, inexorable, nagging, unsparing, cutthroat.
    Nota: Adjetivo.

    Ex: Unrelenting tuition increases are pricing private institutions out of the reach of many middle-class parents.

    Ex: They need to be relentless in their fight for adequate funding so that the library service and the profession are not jeopardised.
    Ex: The ruling also coincided with a flood of mergers and acquisitions that transformed gentlemen publishers into ruthless entrepreneurs.
    Ex: The population explosion and the remorseless growth of knowledge are discussed.
    Ex: Unlike other Swedish illustrators, he used the time consuming and unforgiving technique of wood engraving for his illustrations.
    Ex: The author notes the work of Melvyl Dewey in espousing library education and the bitter opposition from some library leaders.
    Ex: The implacable reduction in the dissemination of public documents constitutes a rebarbative policy that threatens the quality of reference services in libraries.
    Ex: The inexorable tide of automation seems to be threatening the existence of old-fashioned, handwritten copymarking.
    Ex: With inflated prices, the nagging question was whether consumers were being bilked by the market.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: As the saying goes, 'Be as innocent as a lamb, and as wily as a fox' -- shrewdness is a valuable attribute in this cutthroat world.
    * actuar de un modo implacable = play + hardball.
    * ser implacable = play + hardball.

    * * *
    1 ‹odio/furia› implacable; ‹avance/lucha› relentless
    el implacable sol del mediodía the relentless midday sun
    el paso implacable del tiempo the inexorable passage of time
    2 ‹juez/crítico› implacable
    es implacable cuando se trata de corregir errores de ortografía she is unforgiving o uncompromising when it comes to correcting spelling mistakes
    3 ‹enemigo/contrincante› ruthless
    * * *

    implacable adjetivo
    a)odio/furia implacable;

    avance/lucha relentless;
    sol relentless
    b)juez/crítico implacable

    c)enemigo/contrincante ruthless

    implacable adjetivo relentless, implacable
    ' implacable' also found in these entries:
    English:
    bitter
    - fierce
    - persecution
    - pitiless
    - relentless
    - remorseless
    - unrelenting
    - hard
    - implacable
    - ruthless
    - unyielding
    * * *
    1. [odio, ira] implacable;
    [sol] relentless; [clima] harsh;
    el implacable avance del desierto the relentless o inexorable advance of the desert
    2. [persona] inflexible, firm;
    es implacable con sus alumnos she's very hard on her pupils
    3. [incontestable] unassailable;
    un argumento de una lógica implacable an argument of unassailable logic
    * * *
    adj implacable
    * * *
    : implacable, relentless

    Spanish-English dictionary > implacable

  • 6 pródigo

    adj.
    1 prodigal, lavish, profuse.
    2 wasteful, improvident, unsparing, prodigal.
    * * *
    2 (derrochador) wasteful
    \
    ser pródigo,-a en (generoso) to be generous with 2 (derrochador) to be extravagant with
    el Hijo Pródigo the Prodigal Son
    * * *
    (f. - pródiga)
    adj.
    * * *
    pródigo, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (=exuberante) bountiful

    fui tan pródigo en los pormenores que... — I was so lavish in o with details that...

    2) (=generoso) lavish, generous (de with)
    3) (=derrochador) prodigal, wasteful
    2.
    SM / F (=derrochador) spendthrift, prodigal
    * * *
    - ga adjetivo prodigal

    pródigo EN algoprodigal with o (frml) of something

    * * *
    = prodigal, lavish, unsparing, unstinting.
    Ex. The ideal, which we are laughably far from attaining, is that books should be spread with prodigal generosity throughout the community.
    Ex. Library staffing levels were lavish and opening hours long.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex. The revolutionary people of the world are unstinting in their praise.
    ----
    * hijo pródigo, el = prodigal son, the.
    * * *
    - ga adjetivo prodigal

    pródigo EN algoprodigal with o (frml) of something

    * * *
    = prodigal, lavish, unsparing, unstinting.

    Ex: The ideal, which we are laughably far from attaining, is that books should be spread with prodigal generosity throughout the community.

    Ex: Library staffing levels were lavish and opening hours long.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    Ex: The revolutionary people of the world are unstinting in their praise.
    * hijo pródigo, el = prodigal son, the.

    * * *
    1 (derrochador) extravagant, wasteful, prodigal ( liter)
    el Hijo Pródigo ( Bib) the Prodigal Son
    2 (generoso, abundante) pródigo EN algo:
    fue pródigo en alabanzas para con sus colegas he was generous o lavish o unstinting in his praise of his colleagues
    un discurso pródigo en palabras conciliadoras a speech which was full of o ( frml) which abounded in conciliatory words
    * * *

    Del verbo prodigar: ( conjugate prodigar)

    prodigo es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente indicativo

    prodigó es:

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) pretérito indicativo

    Multiple Entries:
    prodigar    
    pródigo
    pródigo,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 (productivo, fértil) bountiful
    2 (generoso) fue pródigo en elogios, he was very lavish with his praise
    3 (que malgasta, derrocha) extravagant, wasteful
    ' pródigo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    pródiga
    English:
    lavish
    - prodigal
    * * *
    pródigo, -a
    adj
    1. [derrochador] extravagant;
    el hijo pródigo [en la Biblia] the prodigal son
    2. [generoso] generous, lavish;
    es muy pródigo con su familia he's very generous to his family
    3. [abundante]
    una región pródiga en recursos naturales a region rich in natural resources;
    un país pródigo en abogados a country with vast numbers of lawyers
    nm,f
    spendthrift
    * * *
    I adj
    1 ( generoso) generous
    2 ( derrochador) extravagant;
    el hijo pródigo the prodigal son
    II m, pródiga f spendthrift
    * * *
    pródigo, -ga adj
    1) : generous, lavish
    2) : wasteful, prodigal
    pródigo, -ga n
    : spendthrift, prodigal

    Spanish-English dictionary > pródigo

  • 7 salvajemente

    adv.
    savagely, wildly.
    * * *
    1 savagely
    * * *
    ADV savagely, brutally
    * * *
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    * * *

    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.

    Spanish-English dictionary > salvajemente

  • 8 violentamente

    adv.
    1 violently, forcibly.
    2 unnaturally.
    3 embarrassingly.
    4 distortedly (interpretación).
    * * *
    1 violently
    * * *
    ADV
    1) (=con violencia) violently; (=con furia) furiously, wildly
    2) (LAm) (=rápidamente) quickly
    * * *
    = violently, wildly, ferociously.
    Ex. I have violently disagreed with this to the Canadian Committee on Cataloging.
    Ex. The rationale is that Renoir would probably spin wildly in his grave at the notion that a black and white photographic reproduction of one of his colored paintings was in any sense his responsibility.
    Ex. The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    ----
    * golpear violentamente = bash.
    * * *
    = violently, wildly, ferociously.

    Ex: I have violently disagreed with this to the Canadian Committee on Cataloging.

    Ex: The rationale is that Renoir would probably spin wildly in his grave at the notion that a black and white photographic reproduction of one of his colored paintings was in any sense his responsibility.
    Ex: The book is so ferociously unsparing in detailing the systematic torment as well as wanton cruelty that the reconstruction of the past is often unbearable.
    * golpear violentamente = bash.

    * * *
    1 (de manera brusca) violently, by force
    2 ( Per fam) (rápidamente) quickly
    * * *
    violently
    * * *
    : by force, violently
    * * *
    violentamente adv roughly

    Spanish-English dictionary > violentamente

  • 9 amplio

    • all-round
    • ample
    • broad-minded
    • broadminded
    • capacious
    • extensive
    • free-handed
    • freehanded
    • generous
    • liberal
    • liberal-minded
    • open marks
    • open-mindedness
    • roomy
    • spacious
    • tolerant
    • unsparing
    • wide-ranging

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > amplio

  • 10 generoso

    • abundant
    • ample
    • big-hearted
    • bighearted
    • bounteous
    • free-handed
    • freehanded
    • generous
    • handsome
    • large-handed
    • large-heartedness
    • nobleman
    • nobleness
    • open grassland
    • open-handedly
    • opencast
    • openhandedly
    • ungrudging
    • unselfish
    • unsparing

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > generoso

  • 11 pródigo

    • extravagant
    • improvident
    • prodigal
    • profuse
    • unsparing
    • unstinting
    • wasted-away
    • wasteful person

    Diccionario Técnico Español-Inglés > pródigo

Mira otros diccionarios:

  • Unsparing — Un*spar ing, a. [Pref. un not + sparing, p. pr. of spare.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not sparing; not parsimonious; liberal; profuse. Burke. [1913 Webster] 2. Not merciful or forgiving. [R.] Milton. [1913 Webster] {Un*spar ing*ly}, adv. {Un*spar… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • unsparing — index benevolent, charitable (benevolent), close (rigorous), copious, liberal (generous) …   Law dictionary

  • unsparing — showing no mercy, 1580s, from UN (Cf. un ) (1) not + sparing (see SPARE (Cf. spare) (v.)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • unsparing — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ merciless; severe. DERIVATIVES unsparingly adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • unsparing — [unsper′iŋ] adj. 1. not sparing or stinting; lavish; liberal; profuse 2. not merciful or forgiving; severe unsparingly adv …   English World dictionary

  • unsparing — adj. unsparing of (unsparing of praise) * * * [ʌn spe(ə)rɪŋ] unsparing of (unsparing of praise) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • unsparing — adjective Date: circa 1586 1. not merciful or forbearing ; hard, ruthless < an unsparing satire > < an unsparing critic > 2. not frugal ; liberal, profuse < unsparing generosity > • unsparingly …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • unsparing — un|spar|ing [ ʌn sperıŋ ] adjective 1. ) an unsparing account or description does not hide the unpleasant details of something: He gave us an unsparing account of his shameful past. 2. ) used about the cruel behavior of someone who does not care… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • unsparing — UK [ʌnˈspeərɪŋ] / US [ʌnˈsperɪŋ] adjective 1) used about the cruel behaviour of someone who does not care if they hurt people 2) an unsparing account or description does not hide the unpleasant details of something He gave us an unsparing account …   English dictionary

  • unsparing — unsparingly, adv. unsparingness, n. /un spair ing/, adj. 1. not sparing; liberal or profuse; excessive. 2. unmerciful; harsh; severe. [1580 90; UN 1 + SPARING] Syn. 1. generous, lavish, bountiful. 2. merciless, unrelenting, relentless. * * * …   Universalium

  • unsparing — adjective Without sparing …   Wiktionary


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