Traducción: de espanol

what's more

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  • what's more — And, more importantly • • • Main Entry: ↑what * * * what’s more mainly spoken phrase used for introducing an additional statement that supports what you have already said Chrysanthemums are such beautiful flowers, and what’s more they are very… …   Useful english dictionary

  • what is more — adverb in addition (Freq. 1) computer chess games are getting cheaper all the time; furthermore, their quality is improving the cellar was dark; moreover, mice nested there what is more, there s no sign of a change • Syn: ↑furthermore, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • what's more — mainly spoken used for introducing an additional statement that supports what you have already said Chrysanthemums are such beautiful flowers, and what s more they are very easy to grow …   English dictionary

  • what's more — the next fact is at least as important or even more important. Military action will hurt ordinary people, and what s more, it won t solve the problem …   New idioms dictionary

  • what is more — and as an additional point; moreover. → what …   English new terms dictionary

  • what is more — adverb furthermore, or in addition, moreover. Ive done it wrong, and whats more I dont care. Syn: furthermore, moreover, in addition …   Wiktionary

  • what is more — in addition especially; this is (even more) important …   Idioms and examples

  • what's more — phrasal in addition ; furthermore …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • and what is more — in addition to this, not only this, not this alone …   English contemporary dictionary

  • what — W1S1 [wɔt US wa:t, wʌt] pron, determiner, predeterminer [: Old English; Origin: hwAt] 1.) used to ask for information or for someone s opinion ▪ What are you doing? ▪ What subjects did you enjoy most? ▪ What colour is the new carpet? ▪ What s… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • what — [ wat, hwat ] function word *** What can be used in the following ways: as a question pronoun (introducing a direct or indirect question): What do you want? Tell me what happened. as a relative pronoun (starting a relative clause that is subject …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English


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